Architectural Record, Volume 41 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Record and Guide, 1917 - Architecture
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Page 288 - puts yourself in his place ; ' which readily accepts a point of view ; which quickly adjusts itself to its environment ; which gives gravity for gravity, lightness for lightness, tears for tears, laughter for laughter. " Discretion. Which seeks always the fitting thing to do, thus supplementing sympathy ; which holds its tongue when speech is unnecessary ; which knows nothing when forgetfulness is a virtue. " Knowledge. The care of speech ; the loving selection of words ; the scrupulous nicety of...
Page 182 - Lure of the antique ; being a book of ready reference for collectors of old furniture, china, mirrors, candlesticks, silverware, pewter, glassware, copper utensils, clocks and other household furnishings of our American forefathers, and a handy guide for the determination of age, style, maker, genuineness and value...
Page 575 - Shelton, William Henry. The Jumel mansion, being a full history of the house on Harlem Heights built by Roger Morris before the revolution. Together with some account of its more notable occupants.
Page 287 - I dare say you know already enough of Architecture to know that the Tuscan is the strongest and most solid of all the Orders ; but, at the same time, it is the coarsest and clumsiest of them. Its solidity does extremely well for the foundation and base floor of a great edifice ; but, if the whole building be Tuscan, it will attract no eyes, it will stop no passengers, it will invite no interior examination ; people will take it for granted that the fmishing and furnishing cannot be worth seeing,...
Page 287 - Accepting this definition as sound, let us note some of the qualities which we find in a gentleman, as we understand the term, and see if they are not equally applicable to good buildings. These are : Repose, Refinement, Self-Containment, Sympathy, Discretion, Knowledge, Urbanity, Modesty. Repose. Quietness of body and mind; not phlegmatism, but enforced quietness, as in the poise of a gladiator. The mind becomes finely receptive when held in this calmness of attitude. Refinement. In which all things...
Page 485 - Joseph E. Widener, President of the Art Jury, who will entertain them at luncheon. The Afternoon Session will also be held in Lynnewood Hall. Those attending the Conference will be guests at dinner at the Ritz-Carlton. The first municipal departments of this kind were appointed in New York and Boston in 1898.
Page 479 - ose« ^ history of Simon Willard, inventor and clockmaker. Together with some account of his sons — his apprentices — and the workmen associated with him, with brief notices of other clockmakers of the family name, by his great grandson, John Ware Willard.
Page 551 - The Prairie Spirit in Landscape Gardening: What the People of Illinois Have Done and Can Do Toward Designing and Planting Public and Private Grounds for Efficiency and Beauty (Urbana: University of Illinois, College of Agriculture, 1915).
Page 182 - McClure, Abbot. The practical book of early American arts and crafts (with a chapter on early lace by Muble Foster Baiiibrldge).
Page 287 - Its solidity does extremely well for the foundation and base floor of a great edifice; but if the whole building be Tuscan, it will attract no eyes, it will stop no passengers, it will invite no interior examination ; people will take it for granted, that the finishing and furnishing cannot be worth seeing, where the front is so unadorned and clumsy. But if, upon the solid Tuscan foundation, the Doric, the Ionic, and the Corinthian Orders rise gradually with all their beauty, proportions, ajid ornaments,...

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