Archaeology and Language: Correlating archaeological and linguistic hypotheses

Front Cover
R. Blench, Matthew Spriggs
Psychology Press, 1998 - Architecture - 431 pages
0 Reviews
Using language to date the origin and spread of food production, Archaeology and Language II represents groundbreaking work in synthesizing two disciplines that are now seen as interlinked: linguistics and archaeology. This volume is the second part of a three-part survey of innovative results emerging from their combination.
Archaeology and historical linguistics have largely pursued separate tracks until recently, although their goals can be very similar. While there is a new awareness that these disciplines can be used to complement one another, both rigorous methodological awareness and detailed case-studies are still lacking in the literature. This three-part survey is the first study to address this.
Archaeology and Language II examines in some detail how archaeological data can be interpreted through linguistic hypotheses. This collection demonstrates the possibility that, where archaeological sequences are reasonably well-known, they might be tied into evidence of language diversification and thus produce absolute chronologies. Where there is evidence for migrations and expansions these can be explored through both disciplines to produce a richer interpretation of prehistory. An important part of this is the origin and spread of food production which can be modelled through the spread of both plants and words for them.
Archaeology and Language II will be of interest to researchers in linguistics, archaeologists and anthropologists.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

a consideration of the evidence
33
2 Neolithic correlates of ancient TibetoBurman migrations
67
3 Archaeology linguistics and the expansion of the East and Southeast Asian Neolithic
103
absolute dating of Austronesian language spread and major subgroups
115
5 The archaeology of Papuan and Austronesian prehistory in the Northern Moluccas Eastern Indonesia
128
the linguisticsarchaeology interface
141
7 The enigma of PamaNyungan expansion in Australia
174
MIGRATION AND EXPANSION AND THEIR LINGUISTIC CORRELATES EURASIAN CASE STUDIES
193
a linguistic critique
267
the creation of English
283
LINGUISTIC MODELS IN RECONSTRUCTING SUBSISTENCE SYSTEMS
295
13 A conservative look at diffusion involving MixeZoquean languages
297
Linguistic evidence for the development of yam and palm culture among the Delta Cross peoples of Southeastern Nigeria
324
15 Japanese rice agriculture terminology and linguistic affiliation of Yayoi culture
366
a regional interdisciplinary approach
379
17 Linguistic data on transmission of Southeast Asian cultigens to India and Sri Lanka
390

8 Ethnicity and language in prehistoric Northeast Asia
195
9 Cultural relationships in NorthCentral Eurasia
209
10 The Eurasian spread zone and the IndoEuropean dispersal
220

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page vi - If we possessed a perfect pedigree of mankind, a genealogical arrangement of the races of man would afford the best classification of the various languages now spoken throughout the world ; and if all extinct languages, and all intermediate and slowly changing dialects, were to be included, such an arrangement would be the only possible one.
Page 7 - ... must rest on the merest conjecture and hypothesis. It may seem strange that anything so vague and arbitrary as language should survive all other testimonies, and speak with more definiteness, even in its changed and modern state, than all other monuments, however grand and durable. Yet so it...
Page vi - ... co-descended races, and had thus given rise to many new dialects and languages. The various degrees of difference between the languages of the same stock, would have to be expressed by groups subordinate to groups; but the proper or even the only possible arrangement would still be genealogical; and this would be strictly natural, as it would connect together all languages, extinct and recent, by the closest affinities, and would give the filiation and origin of each tongue.

References to this book

About the author (1998)

Roger Blench is Research Fellow of the Overseas Development Institute, London. Matthew Spriggs is Professor of Archaeology at the Australian National University, Canberra.

Bibliographic information