Reimagining culture: histories, identities, and the Gaelic renaissance

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Berg, Nov 1, 1997 - Social Science - 297 pages
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Since the 1960s, policies to 'revive' minority cultures and languages have flourished. But what does it mean to have a 'cultural identity'? And are minorities as deeply attached to their languages and traditions as revival policies suppose? This book is a sophisticated analysis of responses to the 'Gaelic renaissance' in a Scottish Hebridean community. Its description of everyday conceptions of belonging and interpretations of cultural policy takes us into the world of Gaelic playgroups, crofting, local history, religion and community development. Historically and theoretically informed, this book challenges many of the ways in which we conventionally think about ethnic and national identity. This accessible and engaging account of life in this remote region of Europe provides an original and timely contribution to questions of considerable currency in a broad range of social science disciplines.

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Contents

Histories
37
Land Religion and
67
Crofting Tradition and People
101
Copyright

7 other sections not shown

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Multiculturalism
C. W. Watson
Snippet view - 2000
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About the author (1997)

Sharon Macdonald is a Senior Lecturer in Social Anthropology and Sociology,at the University of Sheffield.

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