The Chinese Sultanate: Islam, Ethnicity, and the Panthay Rebellion in Southwest China, 1856-1873

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Stanford University Press, 2005 - History - 264 pages
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The Muslim-led Panthay Rebellion was one of five mid-nineteenth-century rebellions to threaten the Chinese imperial court. The Chinese Sultanate begins by contrasting the views of Yunnan held by the imperial center with local and indigenous perspectives, in particular looking at the strong ties the Muslim Yunnanese had with Southeast Asia and Tibet. Traditional interpretations of the rebellion there have emphasized the political threat posed by the Muslim Yunnanese, but no prior study has sought to understand the insurrection in its broader muti-ethnic borderland context. At its core, the book delineates the escalating government support of premeditated massacres of the Hui by Han Chinese and offers the first in-depth examination of the seventeen-year-long rule of the Dali Sultanate.

  

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I liked this book, it was extremely informative, and a real welcome to this subject area where there is little written about.
I good site that draws information from the book is http://muslimwiki.com/mw/index.php/Panthay_Rebellion
gives you an idea of the themes running through the book

Contents

The World of Nineteenth
11
The Muslim Yunnanese
34
Hanjianism Han Newcomers
48
The Rise of AntiHui Hostilities
64
The Kunming Massacre
84
Ma Rulongs Road to Power
116
Du Wenxiu and the Creation
139
The Struggle to Reclaim Yunnan
161
The Aftermath of Rebellion
185
Notes
199
Bibliography
243
Index
261
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About the author (2005)

David G. Atwill is Assistant Professor of Chinese History and Religion at Pennsylvania State University.

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