Essays on husbandry (Google eBook)

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Printed for W. Frederick in Bath, 1764 - Agriculture - 445 pages
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1764/no pp/144

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Page 42 - For it is labour indeed that puts the difference of value on everything; and let any one consider what the difference is between an acre of land planted with tobacco, or sugar, sown with wheat or barley, and an acre of the same land lying in common, without any husbandry upon it, and he will find that the improvement of labour makes the far greater part of the value.
Page 107 - ... one whole peppercorn ; after which let it be returned to its mother. From that time it will become hardy, and fear the cold no more than a hen's chick. But it...
Page 219 - ... in land and poor in all the comforts of life; whom Nature, having furnished as liberally as any other people with the materials of plenty ie a fruitful soil, apt to produce in abundance what might serve for food...
Page 10 - O could I flow like thee! and make thy stream My great example, as it is my theme ! Tho
Page 198 - ... other things, whilst he sells his corn and wool, either at the same rate, or lower, at the market (since the tax laid upon it makes people less forward to buy) must either have his rent abated, or else break and run away in his landlord's debt : and so the yearly value of the land is brought down.
Page 42 - God gave the world to men in common, but since he gave it them for their benefit and the greatest conveniences of life they were capable to draw from it, it cannot be supposed he meant it should always remain common and uncultivated.
Page 170 - Spain has behaved like the foolish king, who desired that every thing he touched might be converted into gold, and who was obliged to beg of the gods to put an end to his misery.
Page 10 - Till then, we in vain, I fear, endeavour with noise, and weapons of law, to drive the wolf from our own to one another's doors : the breed ought to be extirpated out of the island. For want, brought in by ill-management, and nursed up by expensive vanity, will make the nation poor and spare nobody.
Page 28 - ... of new weight to the emptier, as if he took out of the heavier what he adds to the lighter, for then half so much will do it. Riches do not consist in having more gold and silver, but in having more in proportion than the rest of the world, or than our neighbours, whereby we are enabled to procure to...
Page 198 - It is plain, the merchant and broker, neither will, nor can ; for if he pays a quarter more for commodities than he did, he will sell them at a price proportionably raised. The poor labourer and handicraftsman cannot : for he...

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