The Monist, Volume 4 (Google eBook)

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Paul Carus
Open Court, 1894 - Philosophy
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Page 413 - I have already urged, the practice of that which is ethically best — what we call goodness or virtue — involves a course of conduct which, in all respects, is opposed to that which leads to success in the cosmic struggle for existence. In place of ruthless selfassertion it demands self-restraint; in place of thrusting aside, or treading down, all competitors, it requires that the individual shall not merely respect, but shall help his fellows; its influence is directed, not so much to the survival...
Page 473 - and establish the Christian Faith, and to confute all heretics and " schismatics — upon the Divine authority of the holy Scriptures — upon a " the authority of the writings of the primitive Fathers, as to the faith " and practice of the primitive Church — upon the Divinity of our Lord " and Saviour Jesus Christ— upon the Divinity of the Holy Ghost — " upon the Articles of the Christian Faith, as comprehended in the
Page 406 - Let us understand, once for all, that the ethical progress of society depends, not on imitating the cosmic process, still less in running away from it, but in combating it. It may seem an audacious proposal thus to pit the microcosm against the macrocosm and to set man to subdue nature to his higher ends...
Page 404 - I suspect that this fallacy has arisen out of the unfortunate ambiguity of the phrase "survival of the fittest." "Fittest" has a connotation of "best"; and about "best" there hangs a moral flavour. In cosmic nature, however, what is "fittest" depends upon the conditions. Long since, I ventured to point out that if our hemisphere were to cool again, the survival of the fittest...
Page 423 - Let a wise man blow off the impurities of his self, as a smith blows off the impurities of silver, one by one, little by little, and from time to time.
Page 137 - The essential achievement of the will, in short, when it is most 'voluntary,' is to attend to a difficult object and hold it fast before the mind.
Page 439 - Let us live happily then, not hating those who hate us! among men who hate us let us dwell free from hatred!
Page 342 - Whosoever . therefore shall confess Me before men, him will I confess also before My Father which is in heaven. But whosoever shall deny Me before men, him will I also deny before My Father which is in heaven.
Page 133 - Now how do we ever get up under such circumstances? If I may generalize from my own experience, we more often than not get up without any struggle or decision at all. We suddenly find that we have got up. A fortunate lapse of consciousness occurs; we forget both the warmth and the cold; we fall into some revery connected with the day's life, in the course of which the idea flashes across us, 'Hollo! I must lie here no longer...
Page 597 - Vais'eshika Systems. BY JOHN DAVIES, MA (Cantab.), MRAS The system of Kapila contains nearly all that India has produced in the department of pure philosophy.

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