The Works of John Dryden: Dramatic works (Google eBook)

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William Patterson, 1882
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Page 315 - Men suffer all their life long under the foolish superstition that they can be cheated. But it is as impossible for a man to be cheated by any one but himself, as for a thing to be and not to be at the same time.
Page 483 - I FEED a flame within which so torments me, That it both pains my heart and yet contents me; 'Tis such a pleasing smart, and I so love it, That I had rather die than once remove it. Yet he for whom I grieve shall never know it, My tongue does not betray, nor my eyes show it; Not a sigh nor a tear my pain discloses, But they fall silently like dew on roses. Thus to prevent my love from being cruel, My heart's the sacrifice as 'tis the fuel; And while I suffer this to give him quiet, My faith rewards...
Page 16 - And just abandoning the ungrateful stage : Unprofitably kept at Heaven's expense, I live a rent-charge on His providence : But you, whom every Muse and grace adorn, Whom I foresee to better fortune born, Be kind to my remains ; and oh, defend, Against your judgment, your departed friend ! Let not the insulting foe my fame pursue, But shade those laurels which descend to you : And take for tribute what these lines express ; You merit more, nor could my love do less.
Page 138 - For imagination in a poet is a faculty so wild and lawless, that like an high-ranging spaniel, it must have clogs tied to it, lest it outrun the judgment.
Page 128 - I feel death rising higher still and higher, Within my bosom; every breath I fetch Shuts up my life within a shorter compass, And, like the vanishing sound of bells, grows less And less each pulse, till it be lost in air.
Page 295 - I am satisfied if it cause delight. For delight is the chief, if not the only, end of poesy. Instruction can be admitted but in the second place, for poesy only instructs as it delights.
Page 130 - This worthless present was designed you long before it was a play; when it was only a confused mass of thoughts, tumbling over one another in the dark; when the fancy was yet in its first work, moving the sleeping images of things towards the light, there to be distinguished, and then either chosen or rejected by the judgment; it was yours, my Lord, before I could call it mine.
Page 297 - I confess my chief endeavours are to delight the age in which I live. If the humour of this be for low comedy, small accidents, and raillery, I will force my genius to obey it, though with more reputation I could write in verse.
Page 307 - I must crave leave to say, that my whole discourse was sceptical, according to that way of reasoning which was used by Socrates, Plato, and all the academics of old, which Tully and the best of the ancients followed, and which is imitated by the modest inquisitions of the Royal Society.
Page 298 - Our language is noble, full, and significant ; and I know not why he who is master of it may not clothe ordinary things in it as decently as the Latin, if he use the same diligence in his choice of words : delectus verborum origo est eloquentiae.

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