The Rise and Fall of the Plantation Complex: Essays in Atlantic History

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Feb 13, 1998 - History - 222 pages
0 Reviews
Over a period of several centuries, Europeans developed an intricate system of plantation agriculture overseas which was quite different from the agricultural system used at home. Though the plantation complex centered on the American tropics, its influence was much wider. Much more than an economic order for the Americas, the plantation complex had an important place in world history. These essays concentrate on the intercontinental impact.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The Mediterranean origins
3
Sugar planting
4
Cyprus
5
The Mediterranean slave trade
8
The mature plantation complex
10
Forms of cultural encounter
13
Sugar planting from Cyprus to the Atlantic islands
17
The Atlantic islands
18
Slave revolts and maroon settlements
103
The settlement colonies
108
The slave trade and the West African economy in the eighteenth century
113
The economics of supply
116
Political enslavement
119
Economic enslavement
122
Rising demand rising exports
125
Assessing the damage
126

the Canaries
22
The westward migration
23
To the Americas
25
Why migration?
27
Africa and the slave trade
29
Political forms south of the Sahara
33
The transSahara trade
35
Disease and isolation
38
African Muslim and European slavery
40
The beginning of the Atlantic trade
42
Capitalism feudalism and sugar planting in Brazil
46
Intentions and experiments in Brazil
48
The sugar industry
51
Feudalism from below
53
Local government
55
Bureaucrats and free lances in Spanish America
58
The crown and the bureaucracy
59
Intentions and achievements in the American world
62
The West Indies
63
Mexico
64
Encomienda
68
The return of the bureaucrats
69
The sugar revolution and the settlement of the Caribbean
73
European settlement
77
The economics of sugar and disease
79
The sugar revolution
81
Anarchy and imperial control
86
No peace beyond the lines
87
Buccaneers and transfrontiersmen
92
Slave societies on the periphery
98
Placer gold
100
Bandeirantes
102
Atlantic commerce in the eighteenth century
129
Commodities in the African trade
133
The conduct of the African trade
135
Merchants and planters
139
Caribbean trade
141
The Democratic Revolution in the Atlantic basin
144
Industrialism capitalism and imperialism
145
economic social and political
147
The Enlightenment
149
Realignments in the colonial world
151
Democratic revolutions and the plantation complex
153
Counterrevolution in Spanish America
155
Revolution in the French Antilles
158
Social structure and social tensions
160
The revolution on Saint Domingue
163
Other islands other combinations
168
Readjustments in the nineteenth century
173
The end of the slave trade
174
new wine in old bottles
175
The end of slavery in the French and British Caribbean
177
old wine in new bottles
178
African adjustments
180
The politics and economics of legitimate trade
183
The end of slavery in the Americas
189
sugar and coffee
190
differential regional growth
193
Sugar in Cuba
196
Emancipation in Cuba
197
Retrospect
204
Appendix
207
Index
213
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1998)

Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Philip de Armond Curtin was educated at Swarthmore College and at Harvard University, from which he received a Ph.D. in history in 1953. That same year he joined the Swarthmore faculty as an instructor and assistant professor. In 1956, he moved on to the University of Wisconsin at Madison, where he remained for 14 years. During that time he was chair of the Wisconsin University Program in Comparative World History, the Wisconsin African Studies Program, and for five years, Melville J. Herskovits Professor. In 1975, he joined the department of history at Johns Hopkins University. In addition to holding Guggenheim fellowships in 1966 and 1980 and being a senior fellow of the National Endowment for the Humanities, Curtin has taken a leadership role in various organizations, including the African Studies Association, the International Congress of Africanists, and the American Historical Association. He also has gained recognition for his influential books on African history, including The Image of Africa (1964), Africa Remembered (1967), and The Atlantic Slave Trade: A Census (1969). In the latter, he demonstrated that the number of Africans who reached the New World during the centuries of the trans-Atlantic slave trade had been highly exaggerated.

Bibliographic information