The Eclectic Review, Volume 2; Volume 110 (Google eBook)

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C. Taylor, 1859
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Page 79 - When my mother died I was very young, And my father sold me while yet my tongue Could scarcely cry
Page 605 - Where'er I roam, whatever realms to see, My heart untravell'd fondly turns to thee ; Still to my brother turns, with ceaseless pain, And drags at each remove a lengthening chain.
Page 281 - I loth, though pleased at heart, Sweet Highland Girl! from thee to part; For I, methinks, till I grow old As fair before me shall behold As I do now, the cabin small, The lake, the bay, the waterfall; And Thee, the spirit of them all!
Page 135 - All things to man's delightful use: the roof Of thickest covert was inwoven shade, Laurel and myrtle, and what higher grew Of firm and fragrant leaf: on either side Acanthus and each odorous bushy shrub Fenced up the verdant wall; each beauteous flower, Iris all hues, roses, and jessamine, Rear'd high their flourish'd heads between, and wrought Mosaic; under-foot the violet, Crocus, and hyacinth, with rich inlay Broider'd the ground, more colour'd than with stone Of costliest emblem...
Page 607 - We were told, that universal benevolence was what first cemented society ; we were taught to consider all the wants of mankind as our own ; to regard ' the human face divine' with affection and esteem; he wound us up to be mere machines of pity, and rendered us incapable of withstanding the slightest impulse, made either by real or fictitious distress; in a word, we were perfectly instructed in the art of giving away thousands, before we were taught the more necessary qualifications of getting a...
Page 255 - ... houses all in one flame : the noise, and cracking, and thunder of the impetuous flames, the shrieking of women and children, the hurry of people, the fall of towers, houses, and churches was like...
Page 609 - And indeed a child of the public he is in all respects ; for while so well able to direct others, how incapable is he frequently found of guiding himself! His simplicity exposes him to all the insidious approaches of cunning ; his sensibility, to the slightest invasions of contempt. Though possessed of fortitude to stand unmoved the expected bursts of an earthquake, yet of feelings so exquisitely poignant as to agonize under the slightest disappointment. Broken rest, tasteless meals, and causeless...
Page 256 - I can never forget the inexpressible luxury and profaneness, gaming, and all dissoluteness, and as it were total forgetfulness of God, (it being Sunday evening,) which this day se'nnight I was witness of, the King sitting and toying with his concubines, Portsmouth, Cleveland...
Page 79 - Hush, Tom! never mind it, for when your head's bare You know that the soot cannot spoil your white hair.
Page 578 - Graze in his shadow, and his eye obey. The fens and marshes are his cool retreat, His noontide shelter from the burning heat ; Their sedgy bosoms his wide couch are made, And groves of willows give him all their shade. His eye drinks Jordan up, when, fir'd with drought, He trusts to turn its current down his throat ; In lessen'd waves it creeps along the plain ; He sinks a river, and he thirsts again.

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