Society to Encourage Studies at Home: founded in 1873 by Anna Eliot Ticknor : born June 1st, 1823, died October 5th, 1896 (Google eBook)

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Society to Encourage Studies at Home, 1897 - Self-culture - 218 pages
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Page 102 - Mr. W. pressed him again; Mr. T. again answered, " No, Sir, it is no pleasure to me at all ; and if you knew your duty, it would be none to you. I have nothing to do with death, my business is to live as long as I can as well as I can and to serve my Master as faithfully as I can, until he shall think proper to call me home.
Page 203 - Each organ is to every other as an excreting organ. In other words, to insure perfect health, every tissue, bone, nerve, tendon, or muscle should take from the blood certain materials and return to it certain others. To do this every organ must or ought to have its period of activity and of rest, so as to keep the vital fluid in a proper state to nourish every other part.
Page 126 - I was aware, the load was gone. I have written thus of myself, not because my individual experience is of importance enough to interest anyone, but because I believe the world is full of people with the same wants that I have and it may be some satisfaction to know how fully you are supplying them.
Page 204 - ... symptoms the diagnosis is comparatively easy, though when the manifestations are limited to the ocular apparatus alone the disease becomes difficult to discover. Enough, however, has been said to show that the very mutability of the special symptoms affords an excellent criterion for the recognition of " that domestic demon which has produced untold discomfort in many a household, and, I am almost ready to say, as much unhappiness as the husband's...
Page 126 - I do not know where I should stop if I tried to tell how much these library books have helped me in my isolated life I have craved so much and there seemed no access possible to anything I wanted. I have lived always with a longing for something different; life was a burden to be carried cheerfully, yet I never quite conquered the feeling that the burden was heavy.
Page 202 - Add to this such constant fatigue of body, as some forms of business bring about, and you have all the means needed to ruin the man's power of useful labor. I have been careful here to state that combined overwork of mind and body is doubly mischievous, because nothing is now more sure in hygienic science than that a proper alternation of physical and mental labor is best fitted to insure a lifetime of wholesome and vigorous intellectual exertion.
Page 199 - ... most frequently assigned in the reports of our insane asylums; namely, heredity, intemperance, and ill-health. The first authorities, however, consider that such is not entirely the case ; that emotional excitement, disappointed hopes, or some form of egoi'sm are more frequently at fault, and that the best preventive of mental disease, even in those predisposed to it, is education, or wisely directed intellectual activity, leading to a knowledge, of the proper ways of living.
Page 203 - ... to insure perfect health, every tissue, bone, nerve, tendon, or muscle should take from the blood certain materials and return to it certain others. To do this every organ must or ought to have its period of activity and of rest, so as to keep the vital fluid in a proper state to nourish every other part. This process in perfect health is a system of mutual assurance, and is probably essential to a condition of entire vigor of both mind and body.
Page 207 - Entice the trusty sun, if that you can, From his ecliptic line ; beckon the sky. Who lives by rule then, keeps good company. Who keeps no guard upon himself, is slack, And rots to nothing at the next great thaw. Man is a shop of rules, a well-truss'd pack, Whose every parcel underwrites a law. Lose not thyself, nor give thy humors way : God gave them to thee under lock and key.
Page 200 - ... extended sale outside of the society. It treated not only of the external conditions for right living, of fresh air, sunlight, good food, and healthful dress, but also, and in a way which was much in advance of the times, of certain mental conditions affecting health, as the following extracts show : "By nature the nervous organization of women, particularly of American women, is more sensitive than that of men, and many things in the present system of education and of living tend to make it...

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