Delta Chi Quarterly, Volume 4 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Delta Chi Fraternity., 1906 - Greek letter societies
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 205 - They would contain various exceptions to powers not granted, and on this very account would afford a colorable pretext to claim more than were granted; for why declare that things shall not be done which there is no power to do?
Page 210 - It is a question of which of two powers or rights shall prevail the power of the State to legislate or the right of the individual to liberty of person and freedom of contract. The mere assertion that the subject relates though but in a remote degree to the public health does not necessarily render the enactment valid. The act must have a more direct relation, as a means to an end, and the end itself must be appropriate and legitimate, before an act can be held to be valid...
Page 78 - Never stir up litigation. A worse man can scarcely be found than one who does this. Who can be more nearly a fiend than he who habitually overhauls the register of deeds in search of defects in titles, whereon to stir up strife, and put money in his pocket ? A moral tone ought to be infused into the profession which should drive such men out of it.
Page 205 - ... might urge with a semblance of reason that the Constitution ought not to be charged with the absurdity of providing against the abuse of an authority which was not given, and that the provision against restraining the liberty of the press afforded a clear implication that a power to prescribe proper regulations concerning it was intended to be vested in the national government.
Page 205 - For why declare that things shall not be done which there is no power to do ? Why, for instance, should it be said that the liberty of the press shall not be restrained when no power is given by which restrictions may be imposed ? I will not contend that such a provision would confer a regulating power, but it is evident that it would furnish to men disposed to usurp a plausible pretence for claiming that power.
Page 140 - ... permitted or required to work more than eight hours in any one calendar day except in cases of extraordinary emergency caused by fire, flood or danger to life or property.
Page 7 - Without wishing to exaggerate the importance of these writers, or to substitute, in any case, their authority for the principles of reason, it may be affirmed that they are generally impartial in their judgment.
Page 143 - ... one of its municipal agencies, should permit or require an employee on such work to labor in excess of eight hours each day, and to inflict punishment upon those who are embraced by such regulations, and yet disregard them.
Page 211 - Law is stable, . . . societies .. . are progressive. The greater or less happiness of a people depends on the degree of promptitude with which the gulf is narrowed.
Page 206 - The adoption of the first eleven amendments to the constitution so soon after the original instrument was accepted shows a prevailing sense of danger at that time from the federal power. And it cannot be denied that such a jealousy continued to exist with many patriotic men until the breaking out of the late civil war. It was then discovered that the true danger to the perpetuity of the Union was in the capacity of the state organizations to combine and concentrate all the powers of...

Bibliographic information