Dissident Geographies: An Introduction to Radical Ideas and Practice

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Prentice Hall, 2000 - Philosophy - 212 pages
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Dissident Geographies is a lively and accessible exploration of radical perspectives in human geography, spanning anarchism, marxism, feminism, sexual politics and postcolonialism. While some of these radical views are well established bodies of thought in geography, others are relatively new. Dissident Geographies seeks to contextualise these radical ideas and traditions, situating them in the places where they have developed, before looking at the implications they have for geographical thought and practice. The book has two main aims. First, Dissident Geographies introduces a number of geographical traditions that challenge and destabilise what counts as geographical knowledge. Second, the book shows how the production of geographical knowledge is tied to politics and struggles outside, as well as within, the academy. Dissident Geographies traces the spatiality of political practice and the politics of geographical thought, revealing the connections between power, politics and geographical knowledge. The book has two main aims. First, rather than reify 'the' geographical tradition, Dissident Geographies introduces a number of geographical traditions that challenge and destabiliz

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About the author (2000)

Alison Blunt is Lecturer in Geography at Queen Mary and Westfield College, University of London.

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