Shadowings (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Cosimo, Inc., Mar 1, 2007 - Philosophy - 288 pages
1 Review
A menagerie of observation, philosophy, musing, and storytelling, Shadowings is quirky and charming, not unlike its author, transplanted Westerner Lafcadio Hearn. In this work, Hearn takes us from an ancient Japanese legend of love and spirits to an intimate contemplation on fear to a philosophical study of feminine Japanese names. Applying both his keen aesthetic eye and his uncanny ability to translate feelings as well as words, Hearn awakens the intellect and spirit, and offering us a prime view not only into his beloved adopted country, but into humanity itself. Bohemian and writer PATRICK LAFCADIO HEARN (1850-1904) was born in Greece, raised in Ireland, and worked as newspaper reporter in the United States before decamping to Japan. He also wrote In Ghostly Japan (1899), and Kwaidon (1904).
  

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: Shadowings

User Review  - Cathy - Goodreads

This is a total hodgepodge, with a few ghost stories, some anthropological studies of aspects of Japanese culture, and some unrelated personal essays. But it's an INTERESTING hodgepodge, if you want ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

I
5
II
15
III
23
IV
33
V
41
VI
57
VII
71
VIII
78
XV
193
XVI
197
XVII
203
XVIII
213
XIX
217
XX
219
XXI
225
XXII
235

IX
87
X
105
XI
118
XII
144
XIII
151
XIV
157
XXIV
238
XXV
244
XXVI
249
XXVII
265
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 11 - ... utter amazement, lying upon the naked boards of a mouldering floor. . . . Had he only dreamed a dream? No: she was there; she slept. . . . He bent above her and looked and shrieked for the sleeper had no face! . . . Before him, wrapped in its grave-sheet only, lay the corpse of a woman a corpse so wasted that little remained save the bones, and the long black tangled hair.
Page 6 - But it was in the time of the thoughtlessness of youth, and the sharp experience of want, that the Samurai could not understand the worth of the affection so lightly cast away. His second marriage did not prove a happy one; the character of his new wife was hard and selfish; and he soon found every cause to think with regret of Kyoto days. Then he discovered that he still loved his first wife.

About the author (2007)

Hearn (1850-1904) was born in Levkas, Greece, as the son of Greek and British parents. In 1869 he went to the United States and did various work, finally as a journalist. In 1890 he came to Japan and taught English in Japanese schools, and became a Japanese citizen under the name of Koizumi Yakuma. He died in Tokyo.

Bibliographic information