The Lives of Those Eminent Antiquaries John Leland, Thomas Hearne, and Anthony Wood;: The life of Mr. Anthony Wood (Google eBook)

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William Huddesford
Printed at the Clarendon Press, for J. and J. Fletcher, in the Turl, and Joseph Pote, at Eton College., 1772 - Authors, English - 462 pages
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Page 182 - John Locke of Christchurch was afterwards a noted writer. This John Locke was a man of a turbulent spirit, clamorous, and never contented. The club wrote and took notes from the mouth of their master, who...
Page 45 - Hall the juniors or freshmen between that time and six of the clock, and there make them sit downe on a forme in the middle of the Hall, joyning to the declaiming desk, which done, every one in order was to speake some pretty apothegme, or make a jest or bull, or speake some eloquent nonsense to make the company laugh. But if any of the freshmen came off dull or not cleverly, some of the forward or pragmatical seniors would 'tuck...
Page 45 - Feb. 15, the fire being made in the common hall before 5 of the clock at night, the fellowes would go to supper before six, and making an end sooner than at other times, they left the hall to the libertie of the under-graduats, but with an admonition from one of the fellowes (who was the principal of the under-graduats and post-masters), that all things should be carried in good order.
Page 253 - Dr Bathurst took his place of vicechancellor ; a' man of good parts, and able to do good things ; but he has a wife that scorns that he should be in print ; a scornful woman ! scorns that he was dean of Wells : no need of marrying such a woman, who is so conceited, that she thinks herself fit to govern a college, .or university...
Page 204 - Wood of Merton Coll. was the Author, but was not. Whereupon Mr. Aubrey, a pretender to Antiquities, having been contemporary to A. Wood's elder brother in Trin. Coll. and well acquainted with him, he thought that he might be as well acquainted with AW himself.
Page 49 - ... place as a dog at mutton. ' " I am none of the university blood-hounds that seek for preferment, and whose noses are as acute as their eares, that lye perdue for places, and who good saints do groan till the visitation comes.
Page 360 - I must tell you that in the king my father's time the church of England's men and the Catholicks loved each other and were, as 'twere, all one; but now there is gotten a spirit among you which is quite contrary...
Page 206 - Hoc erat in votis : modus agri non ita magnus, Hortus ubi et tecto vicinus jugis aquae fons Et paulum silvae super his foret. Auctius atque Di melius fecere. Bene est. Nil amplius oro, Maia nate, nisi ut propria haec mihi munera faxis.
Page 46 - ... or salt put in college beere, with tucks to boot. Afterwards when they were to be admitted into the fraternity, the senior cook was to administer to them an oath over an old shoe, part of which runs thus " Item tu jurabis quod penniless bench non visitabis &c.
Page 186 - AW had some acquaintance with Sir Charles Sedley ; and afterwards some acquaintance with Charles lord Buckhurst, when he was earl of Middlesex ; at which time he would come with Fleetwood Shepheard to Great Rowlright in Oxfordshire, and thence 3 miles beyond, to Weston in the parish of Long'Compton, to visit Mr. Ralph Sheldon, where he found AW and discoursed very seriously with him.

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