The Analects

Front Cover
Filiquarian Publishing, LLC., 2006 - Literary Criticism - 140 pages
24 Reviews
Few individuals have shaped their country's civilization more profoundly than the Master Kong, better-known as Confucius (551-479 BC). His sayings and those of his disciples form the foundation of a distinct social, ethical, and intellectual system. They have retained their freshness andvigor throughout the two and a half millennia of their currency, and are still admired even in today's China. This lively new translation offers clear explanatory notes by one of the foremost scholars of classical Chinese, providing an ideal introduction to the Analects for readers who have no previous knowledge of the Chinese language and philosophical traditions.
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Zissou54 - LibraryThing

One of most well known books in the world's history and for good reason. I originally purchased this book only because it was required for a class I was taking but ended up hanging on it because I ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - David.Alfred.Sarkies - LibraryThing

While I have credited the writing of this work to Confucius, it was not actually written by him but rather by his disciples. Thus Confucius joins Socrates and Jesus Christ in having an enormous ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Is it not pleasant to learn
5
He who exercises government
9
If he can bear to do this
15
It is virtuous manners
21
The Master said of Kungye Chang
25
He might occupy the place of a prince
31
Believing in and loving the ancients
37
The highest point of virtuous action
45
The men of former times
65
Yen Yuan asked about perfect virtue
73
Tszelu asked about government
81
Hsien asked what was shameful
89
The Duke Ling of Wei asked Confucius about tactics
99
The head of the Chi family
107
Yang Ho wished to see Confucius
115
The Viscount of Wei withdrew from the court
123

The subjects of which the Master seldom spoke
51
Confucius in his village looked simple and sincere
57
The scholar trained for public duty
129
The Heavendetermined order of succession
135

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About the author (2006)

Burton Watson has taught at Columbia, Stanford, and Kyoto Universities and is one of the world's best-known translators of Chinese and Japanese works. His translations include The Tales of the Heike; The Lotus Sutra; the writings of Zhuangzi, Mozi, Xunzi, and Han Feizi; The Columbia Book of Chinese Poetry; and Records of the Grand Historian.

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