Translating a Tradition: Studies in American Jewish History

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Academic Studies PRess, 2008 - History - 327 pages
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Divided into three sections, this work explains how the concepts and practices of traditional European Judaism were adapted to North American culture beginning in the late nineteenth century. Part I focuses on the ideas and activities of Cyrus Adler (1863-1940), one of the most prominent leaders of the traditionalist United States Jewish community in his era. The issues in these essays include the origins of American Jewish history as a field of study, the Kehilla experiments of the early twentieth century, and the relationship between the Jewish Theological Seminary and Orthodox Judaism. Part II deals with the beginnings of Hasidic Judaism in North America prior to the Second World War. It also includes several studies investigating the shaping of the worldview of Orthodox Judaism in contemporary North America. Part III examines the issue of contemporary American Jewish attitudes toward evolution and intelligent design.
  

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Contents

III
2
IV
16
V
31
VI
47
VII
54
VIII
65
IX
86
X
157
XIII
190
XIV
206
XV
223
XVI
241
XVII
258
XVIII
272
XIX
293
XX
294

XI
185
XII
189

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About the author (2008)

Ira Robinson is Professor of Judaic Studies in the Department of Religion of Concordia University, Montreal, Quebec. He is president of the Canadian Society for Jewish Studies. His latest book is Rabbis and Their Community: Studies in the Eastern European Orthodox Rabbinate in Montreal, 1896-1930 (2007).

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