Experiments and Observations on Different Kinds of Air and Other Branches of Natural Philosophy, Connected with the Subject ...: Being the Former Six Volumes Abridged and Methodized, with Many Additions, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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T. Pearson, 1790 - Air
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Page 107 - I presently found that, by means of this lens, air was expelled from it" very readily. Having got about three or four times as much as the bulk of my materials, I admitted water to it, and found that it was not imbibed by it. But what surprized me more than I can well express, was, that a candle burned in this air with a remarkably vigorous flame...
Page 103 - For my own part, I will frankly acknowledge that at the commencement of the experiments recited in this section I was so far from having formed any hypothesis that led to the discoveries I made in pursuing them that they would have appeared very improbable to me had I been told of them ; and when the decisive facts did at length obtrude themselves upon my notice it was very slowly, and with great hesitation, that I yielded to the evidence of my senses.
Page 117 - ... of its original quantity. I then put a third measure to it; but this did not diminish it any farther: but, however, left it one measure less than it was even after the mouse had been taken out of it. Being now fully satisfied that this air, even after the mouse had breathed it half an hour, was much better than common air; and having a quantity of it still left, sufficient for the experiment, viz.
Page 116 - I had a view to publishing the most generally satisfactory account of my experiments that the nature of the thing would admit of. This experiment with the mouse, when I had reflected upon it some time, gave me so much suspicion that the air into which I had put it was better than common air that I was induced, the day after, to apply the test of nitrous air to a small part of that very quantity of air which the mouse had breathed so long...
Page 104 - I was, however, soon satisfied that atmospherical air is not an unalterable thing; for that the phlogiston with which it becomes loaded from bodies burning in it, and animals breathing it, and various other chemical processes, so far alters and depraves it, as to render it altogether unfit for inflammation, respiration, and other purposes to which it is subservient; and I had discovered that agitation in...
Page 257 - ... in which they muft neceflarily breathe it. On this account, I have thought it right to make this communication as early as I conveniently could ; and, as Dr. Alexander appears to be an ingenuous and benevolent man, 7 I doubt not but he will thank me for it.
Page 112 - But in the course of this month, I not only ascertained the nature of this kind of air, though very gradually, but was led by it to the complete discovery of the constitution of the air we breathe.
Page 106 - But having afterwards procured a lens of twelve inches diameter and twenty inches focal distance, I proceeded with great alacrity to examine by the help of it what kind of air a great variety of substances, natural and factitious, would yield, putting them into glass vessels, which I filled with quicksilver, and kept them inverted in a basin of the same.
Page 256 - Alexander's opinion is rendered fo plaufible by his experiments, that it is very poffible that many perIbns may be rendered fecure, and thoughtlefs of danger, in a fituation in which they muft neceflarily breathe it. On this account, I have thought it right to make this communication as early as I conveniently could; and as Dr. Alexander appears to be an ingenuous and benevolent man, I doubt not but he will thank me for it.
Page 113 - ... was diminished quite as much as common air, and that the redness of the mixture was likewise equal to that of a similar mixture of nitrous and common air. After this I had no doubt but that the air from mercurius calcinatus was fit for respiration, and that it had all the other properties of genuine common air. But I did not take notice of what I might have observed, if I had not been so fully possessed...

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