Ladies' Botany, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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1865 - 579 pages
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Page 3 - Thou bidd'st The lilies of the field with placid smile Reprove man's feverish strivings, and infuse Through his worn soul a more unworldly life, With their soft holy breath. Thou hast not left His purer nature, with its fine desires...
Page v - ... it has mastered the difficulty, and got possession of truth. But here care must be taken to avoid the other extreme : a man must not stick at every useless nicety, and expect mysteries of science in every trivial question or scruple that he may raise.
Page 89 - ... credulous inference that its leaves are constructed for that specific object, whether insects subserve the purpose of nourishment to the plant or not. It is no objection to this view that they are subject to blind accident, and sometimes close upon straws, as well as insects. It would be a curious vegetable indeed that had a faculty of distinguishing bodies, and recoiled at the touch of one, while it quietly submitted to violence from another. Such capricious sensitiveness is not a property of...
Page 3 - By the breath of flowers, Thou callest us, from city throngs and cares, Back to the woods, the birds, the mountain streams, That sing of Thee! back to free childhood's heart, Fresh with the dews of tenderness! Thou bidd'st The lilies of the field with placid smile Reprove man's feverish strivings, and infuse Through his worn soul a more unworldly life, With their soft holy breath.
Page 3 - Her minster-cells dark glen and forest bower, Where, thrilling with its earliest sense of thee, Amidst the low religious whisperings And shivery leaf-sounds of the solitude, The spirit wakes to worship, and is made Thy living temple. By the breath of flowers Thou callest us, from city throngs...
Page 88 - Dionaea muscipula. I therefore deem it no credulous inference, that its leaves are constructed for that specific object, whether insects subserve the purpose of nourishment to the plant or not. It is no objection to this view that they are subject to blind accident, and sometimes close upon straws as well as insects. It would be a curious vegetable indeed, that had a faculty of distinguishing bodies, and recoiled at the touch of one, while it quietly submitted to violence from another.
Page 88 - ... other part, without sensible effects. The little prisoner is not crushed and suddenly destroyed, as is sometimes supposed, for I have often liberated captive flies and spiders, which sped away as fast as fear or joy could hasten them.
Page 87 - I venture a short notice of this interesting and curious plant, not being aware that any popular description of it has been published in this country. The leaf, which is the only remarkable part, springs from the root, spreading upon the ground, or at a little elevation above it.
Page 88 - Each side of the leaf is a little concave on the inner side, where are placed three delicate, hairlike organs, in such an order, that an insect can hardly traverse it without interfering with one of them, when the two sides suddenly collapse and inclose the prey with a force surpassing an insect's efforts to escape. The fringe or hairs of the opposite sides of the leaf interlace, like the fingers of the two hands clasped together.
Page 3 - Of poet hearts, touched by their fervent dreams With spiritual light, and made a source Of heaven-ascending thoughts. E'en to faint age Thou lend'st the vernal bliss : the old man's eye Falls on the kindling blossoms, and his soul Remembers youth and love, and hopefully Turns unto Thee, who call'st earth's buried germs From dust to...

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