The General Biographical Dictionary: Containing an Historical and Critical Account of the Lives and Writings of the Most Eminent Persons in Every Nation; Particularly the British and Irish; from the Earliest Accounts to the Present Time, Volume 7 (Google eBook)

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Alexander Chalmers
J. Nichols, 1813 - Biography
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Page 340 - If the local constituent should have an interest, or should form an hasty opinion, evidently opposite to the real good of the rest of the community, the member for that place ought to be as far as any other from any endeavour to give it effect.
Page 289 - As for his person, he was tall of stature, strong-boned, though not corpulent, somewhat of a ruddy face, with sparkling eyes, wearing his hair on his upper lip, after the old British fashion ; his hair reddish, but, in his latter days, time had sprinkled it with grey; his nose well set, but not declining or bending, and his mouth moderately large ;' his forehead something high; and his habit always plain and modest.
Page 146 - His style isj indeed, a tissue of many languages ; a mixture of heterogeneous words, brought toge-ther from distant regions, with terms originally appropriated to one art, and drawn by violence into the service of another.
Page 334 - I venture to say, it did so happen that persons had a single office divided between them who had never spoken to each other in their lives, until they found themselves, they knew not how, pigging together, heads and points, in the same truckle-bed.
Page 384 - Young Davenant was telling us at court how he was set upon by the Mohocks, and how they ran his chair through with a sword. It is not safe being in the streets at night for them. The bishop of Salisbury's son * is said to be of the gang.
Page 334 - He made an administration, so chequered and speckled ; he put together a piece of joinery, so crossly indented and whimsically dove-tailed ; a cabinet so variously inlaid ; such a piece of diversified Mosaic ; such a tesselated pavement without cement ; here a bit of black stone, and there a bit of white...
Page 465 - When it was known, it was necessarily admired: the King quoted, the courtiers studied, and the whole party of the royalists applauded it. Every eye watched for the golden shower which was to fall upon the author, who certainly was not without his part in the general expectation. In 1664 the second part appeared; the curiosity of the nation was rekindled, and the writer was again praised and elated. But praise was his whole reward. Clarendon, says Wood, gave him reason to hope for " places and employments...
Page 145 - ... does not discover some skill ; and scarce any kind of knowledge, profane or sacred, abstruse or elegant, which he does not appear to have cultivated with success. His exuberance of knowledge, and plenitude of ideas, sometimes obstruct the tendency of his reasoning, and the clearness of his decisions : on whatever subject he employed his mind, there started up immediately so many images before him, that he lost one by grasping another. His memory supplied him with so many illustrations, parallel...
Page 159 - The King to Oxford sent a troop of horse, For Tories own no argument but force ; With equal skill to Cambridge books he sent, For Whigs admit no force but argument.
Page 217 - An Eclog treating Of Crownes, and of Garlandes, and to whom of right they appertaine Addressed, and consecrated to the Kings Maiestie By GB Knight.

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