Folk Music: A Regional Exploration (Google eBook)

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 2005 - History - 335 pages
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American folk music has provided a narrative thread to the fibre of the US since its earliest days. Forms ranging from New England sea shanties to Pennsylvania Dutch worksongs helped shape life in the Northeast. Appalachian ballads evolved in the South, as did slave spirituals that served as codes for the Underground Railroad. Folk ballads on lumbering and mining grew in the Midwest and Northwest, while cowboy ballads emerged across the Great Plains and the West, and railroad songs accompanied expansion along the American frontier. Norm Cohen presents a thorough exploration of the many ways in which folk music genres and subgenres have arisen in different regions of America. Chapters on folk song types, folk instrumentation, and the urban folk revival set further context to the discussion, and an itemized summary of noted folksong collections serves as an additional tool for both general readers and folk music scholars.
  

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Contents

Types of American Folk Music Ballads and Songs
1
Instruments and Musical Aspects
63
Folk Music of the Northeast
83
Folk Music of the Southeast
109
Folk Music of the Midwest and Great Lakes Region
149
Folk Music of the Far West
167
Urban Centers and Folk Music
207
Biographical Sketches
241
Plot Synopses of Traditional Ballads Most Commonly Found in the United States and Canada
277
Glossary
301
Bibliography
309
Index
323
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About the author (2005)

NORM COHEN is the author of Long Steel Rail: The Railroad in American Folksong (1981) and Traditional Anglo-American Folk Music: An Annotated Discography of Published Recordings (1994). He has edited and/or annotated two dozen albums, and written extensively on various aspects of folk, country, and popular music. He is a retired chemist and currently teaches physical science in Portland, Oregon

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