Advanced Racing Tactics

Front Cover
W. W. Norton & Company, May 1, 1986 - Sports & Recreation - 400 pages
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Today far more sailors than ever before have reached a superior level of competitive ability, and the few individuals who remain at the head of the competitive classes year and after year must constantly improve their skills. This book will help the sailor analyze for himself the determinants of tactical success.

One of the foremost theoreticians of the art of yacht racing, Stuart H. Walker is also an outstanding practicing racer. For eight years Dr. Walker kept a complete record of the factors that determined the outcome of every race in which he competed. The recommendations he offers in Advanced Racing Tactics are based upon the analysis of these races—the mistakes and the successes. He sets forth basic principles of starting, beating, reaching, and mark rounding that should be practiced every time, and he underlines what mattered, what consistently provided an advantage.

The advanced racing skipper, Dr. Walker writes, must look around, examine his own mistakes and successes, record them, review them, remember them. When he recognizes from this own experience the validity of the principles presented here, they will become useful to him. When he has incorporated them into his regular racing patterns, he will have made a five- or ten-year leap forward.
  

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Contents

Foreword
9
General
13
Series Strategy
15
Major Mistakes
23
Race Management
28
How the Specialists Win
35
Flexibility
39
The Obviously Wrong Tack
44
Sail Away from the New Wind?
207
The First or Second Tack
214
Watch the Competition
219
Tacking
224
The Tack Away
232
The Management of Oscillating Shifts
237
Oscillating Wind Angles
241
The OneLeg Beat
250

Greed
47
The Skippers Job
51
The Crews Job
56
A Classic Example
59
Tactical Principles
65
Clear Air
67
Shifting Gears
73
The Utilization of Wind Shifts
80
Light Air
89
Heavy Air
97
Fact and Fiction
107
Basic Requirements
116
Starting 18 The Starting Plan
123
Starting Technique
129
The Timed Start
136
Starting at the Windward End
141
Starting at the Leeward End
150
MiddleoftheLine Starts
157
Off on Port
161
Starting in Light Air
166
Starting in Oscillating Winds
171
Meeting and Circling
177
Control Techniques
186
Recognizing the Persistent Shift
197
The StarboardTack Parade
255
Approaching the Weather Mark
260
The Second and Third Beats
269
Reaching
277
Leaving the Weather Mark
279
Up the Reach Strategic Considerations
285
High or Low WindStrength Considerations
291
When Not to Set the Spinnaker SailingAngle Considerations
295
The Jibe Mark
302
The Second Reach
309
Running
319
Starting the Run
321
Tacking Downwind
328
Downwind Strategy
335
Tactics on the Run
342
Approaching the Leeward Mark
348
Finishing
357
Tactical Control
359
The Finish Point
369
International Yacht Racing Union RulesDefinitions
375
International Yacht Racing Union RulesPart IV
377
Glossary
385
Index
393
Copyright

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About the author (1986)

Stuart H. Walker is professor of pediatrics emeritus at the University of Maryland Medical School and an international dinghy champion. He was a member of the 1968 U.S. Olympic team and the 1979 U.S. Pan-American Team.

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