The Wheel on the School

Front Cover
HarperCollins, Jan 21, 1954 - Juvenile Fiction - 298 pages
29 Reviews

Why do the storks no longer come to the little Dutch fishing village of Shora to nest? It was Lina, one of the six schoolchildren who first asked the question, and she set the others to wondering. And sometimes when you begin to wonder, you begin to make things happen. So the children set out to bring the storks back to Shora. The force of their vision put the whole village to work until at last the dream began to come true.

Winner, 1955 Newbery Medal
Notable Children's Books of 19401970 (ALA)
1963 Lewis Carroll Shelf Award

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - antiquary - LibraryThing

I have a fairly dim recollection that this was read to me as a child. My recollection is that it was read in school, but since we had this copy when my brother and I were very young, it may be that my mother read it to us. At this point all I remember is that the wheel was for storks to nest on. Read full review

Review: The Wheel on the School

User Review  - Madison - Goodreads

I haven't read this one in a while, but I read it quite a number of times growing up. I remember it being rather slow in parts, a bit superstitious in regards to the storks being good luck, but an all over good story. Read full review

About the author (1954)

Meindert DeJong is the award-winning author of many classic books for children, including the Newbery Medal-winning The Wheel On The Schooland the Newbery Honor-winning Along Came A Dog, Shadrach,and The House Of Sixty Fathers, all available in Harper Trophy editions and illustrated by Maurice Sendak. Among Mr. Sendak's other popular books is his Caldecott Medal-winning Where The Wild Things Are.

In addition to Where the Wild Things Are, Maurice Sendak's books include Kenny's Window, Very Far Away, The Sign on Rosie's Door, Nutshell Library (consisting of Chicken Soup with Rice, Alligators All Around, One Was Johnny, and Pierre), Higglety Pigglety Pop! or There Must Be More to Life, In the Night Kitchen, Outside Over There, We Are All in the Dumps with Jack and Guy, and Bumble-Ardy.

He received the 1964 Caldecott Medal for Where the Wild Things Are; the 1970 Hans Christian Andersen Award for Illustration; the 1983 Laura Ingalls Wilder Award, given by the American Library Association in recognition of his entire body of work; and a 1996 National Medal of Arts in recognition of his contribution to the arts in America. In 2003, he received the first Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award, an international prize for children's literature established by the Swedish government.

Bibliographic information