The Bucks of Wethersfield, Connecticut and the families with which they are connected by marriage: a biographical and genealogical sketch (Google eBook)

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Stone Printing and Manufacturing Co., 1909 - 304 pages
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Page 107 - ... some knowledge of the law, which proved of great service to him in his subsequent life. At the age of twenty he received a captain's commission from Queen Elizabeth and commanded a company of volunteers under Henry IV of France at the siege of Amiens in 1597. On the conclusion of peace the next year he returned to England and settled near Northampton, where he was in the neighborhood of Dod, Hildersham, and other eminent Puritan divines, and became himself a non-conformist. After this he was...
Page 139 - ... .Samuel Phillips in his business, and was a trustee of Phillips Academy. In 1797 he moved to Concord, New Hampshire, traded in goods, and represented the town in the General Court for three years. In 1802 he moved to Hallowell, Maine. In 1803 he removed to Topsham. and in 1804 or 1805, to Brunswick. He was a useful member of the Board of Overseers of Bowdoin College, and a senator for the county of Cumberland in the legislature of Maine. In the several offices which he sustained he was capable,...
Page 139 - His mind was active, his perceptions quick, his memory prompt, his judgment sound, his disposition mild. He was facetious, affable, and benevolent, and had a fund of anecdote. Early impressed with a sense of right and wrong, he was upright in his dealings, faithful in business, a firm friend and supporter of religion and religious institutions, and active in the cause of education. One son and seven grandsons have had collegiate education.
Page 52 - Laboratory of the Alumni Association of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York ; Lecturer on Normal Histology in Yale College.
Page 134 - ... enjoyed in England, they are the result of the struggles of the Puritans. Even Hume, no partial friend of the Puritans, is constrained to admit, " that whatever spark of liberty we have remaining to us is owing to the Puritans alone." The tree of liberty in this country was of their planting and culture. It might, under other circumstances, seem unbecoming in us to speak of the virtues of the descendants of our ancestor, but in a Genealogical Register prepared for the family, it will not be thought...
Page 64 - Anchylosed at a Right angle; restored nearly to a straight position, after the excision of a wedge-shaped portion of bone, consisting of the patella, condyles, and articular surface of the tibia.
Page 139 - ... He built the first mills on Souhegan River, in Wilton ; was employed in town business ; was the first representative to the General Court, and the first justice of the peace in the town; was Justice of the Court of Common Pleas, and a Councillor of State. He moved to Andover, and assisted Honorable .Samuel Phillips in his business, and was a trustee of Phillips Academy. In 1797 he moved to Concord, New Hampshire, traded in goods, and represented the town in the General Court for three years....
Page 16 - ... Dec. 18, 1717, aged 74. His will was dated March 15, 1721, and all his children were living at that time. He bequeathed to his- grandson, John Richards, among other things, "that bond which I had from my nephew Oliver Manwaring in England." The Manwarings who settled in the vicinity of New-London, are said to have been noted for a sanguine temperament, resolution, impetuosity, and a certain degree of obstinacy. . They were lovers of discussion and good cheer. A florid complexion, piercing black...
Page 63 - ... statement. Among these, what is now known as Buck's operation for oedema of the glottis holds a deservedly high rank. But in no department did he gain more laurels than in autoplastic surgery. His devotion to this branch, during the...
Page 37 - It occurred to me that if that bill was to be printed in the record, it ought to be printed as passed : otherwise it would be very misleading. Mr. HANECY. I have tried very hard. Mr. Chairman and gentlemen, to get a copy of the bill as amended, but up to the present time I have not been able to do so. The CHAIRMAN. Can it not be held until that can be done? Mr. HANECY. Yes; I will do that; but I want it to have a place in the record, and I want to save that now. The CHAIRMAN. It might be well to...

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