Lectures on Metaphysics and Logic, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Gould and Lincoln, 1860 - Logic - 510 pages
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Page 433 - And feel thy sovran vital lamp ; but thou Revisit'st not these eyes, that roll in vain To find thy piercing ray, and find no dawn ; So thick a drop serene hath quenched their orbs, Or dim suffusion veiled.
Page 18 - There is surely a piece of divinity in us; something that was before the elements, and owes no homage unto the sun.
Page 58 - ye become as little children, ye shall not enter the kingdom of heaven.
Page 18 - Now for my life, it is a miracle of thirty years, which to relate, were not a history but a piece of poetry, and would sound to common ears like a fable; for the world, I count it not an inn but an hospital, and a place, not to live but to die in.
Page 479 - I have a faculty of imagining, or representing to myself, the ideas of those particular things I have perceived, and of variously compounding and dividing them. I can imagine a man with two heads ; or the upper parts of a man joined to the body of a horse.
Page 358 - But this universal and primary opinion of all men is soon destroyed by the slightest philosophy, which teaches us that nothing can ever be present to the mind but an image or perception...
Page 121 - THE Mind, being every day informed, by the Senses, of the alteration of those simple Ideas, it observes in things without; and taking notice how one comes to an end, and ceases to be, and another begins to exist, which was not before; reflecting also on what passes within it self, and observing a constant change of its Ideas, sometimes by the impression of outward Objects on the Senses...
Page 605 - The young of all animals appear to me to receive pleasure simply from the exercise of their limbs and bodily faculties, without reference to any end to be attained, or any use to be answered by the exertion. A child, without knowing anything of the use of language, is in a high degree delighted with being able to speak.
Page 607 - Risen from the grave to ease the heavy guilt Of deeds in life conceal'd ; of shapes that walk At dead of night, and clank their chains, and wave The torch of hell around the murderer's bed. At every solemn pause the crowd recoil, Gazing each other speechless, and congeal'd With shivering sighs ; till eager for th' event, Around the beldame all erect they hang, Each trembling heart with grateful terrors quell'd.
Page 494 - THE assignation of particular names to denote particular objects, that is, the institution of nouns substantive, would, probably be one of the ' first steps towards the formation of language. Two savages, who had never been taught to speak, but had been bred up remote from the societies of men, would naturally begin to form that language by which they would endeavour to make their mutual wants intelligible to each other, by uttering certain sounds, whenever they meant to denote certain objects.

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