David Copperfield

Front Cover
Plain Label Books, Sep 1, 2010 - Juvenile Fiction - 112 pages
12 Reviews
Charles Dickens presents the classic tale of David Copperfield to readers young and old. From the loss of Copperfield's father before his birth, through his mother's remarriage, to finding the love of his life, Dickens reveals the heartbreak, hope, and friendship found along an ordinary life. Young readers can follow the tale of love in the Calico Illustrated Classics adaptation of Dickens's David Copperfield.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
8
4 stars
3
3 stars
0
2 stars
0
1 star
1

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

i so love this story as i was bought yp in a home as such for 10 years and can relate to the story. it was beautifully set up as a story line and i would like to say thanks to the author for such a great book

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

This is Volume IV.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 1435 - Beneath those rugged elms, that yew-tree's shade Where heaves the turf in many a mouldering heap, Each in his narrow cell for ever laid, The rude Forefathers of the hamlet sleep.
Page 1598 - Some ran wildly up and down along the beach, crying for help where no help could be. I found myself one of these, frantically imploring a knot of sailors whom I knew, not to let those two lost creatures perish before our eyes. They were making out to me, in an agitated way - I don't know how, for the little I could hear I was scarcely composed enough to understand - that the lifeboat had been bravely manned an hour ago, and could do nothing...
Page 359 - Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen nineteen six, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery.
Page 341 - I remember, to take warning by his fate ; and to observe that if a man had twenty pounds a year for his income, and spent nineteen pounds nineteen shillings and sixpence, he would be happy, but that if he spent twenty pounds one he would be miserable.
Page 1594 - I walked to and fro, tried to read an old gazetteer, listened to the awful noises : looked at faces, scenes, and figures in the fire. At length, the steady ticking of the undisturbed clock on the wall tormented me to that degree that I resolved to go to bed. It was reassuring, on such a night, to be told that some of the inn-servants had agreed together to sit up until morning. I went to bed, exceedingly weary and heavy ; but, on my lying down, all such sensations vanished, as if by magic, and I...
Page 326 - Arrived at his house in Windsor Terrace (which I noticed was shabby like himself, but also, like himself, made all the show it could), he presented me to Mrs.
Page 322 - No words can express the secret agony of my soul as I sunk into this companionship; compared these everyday associates with those of my happier childhood; and felt my early hopes of growing up to be a learned and distinguished man crushed in my breast.
Page 325 - ... that your peregrinations in this metropolis have not as yet been extensive, and that you might have some difficulty in penetrating the arcana of the Modern Babylon in the direction of the City Road in short,
Page 333 - Adelphi, because it was a mysterious place, with those dark arches. I see myself emerging one evening from some of these arches, on a little public-house close to the river, with an open space before it, where some coal-heavers were dancing ; to look at whom I sat down upon a bench. I wonder what they thought of me ! I was such a child, and so little, that frequently when I went into the bar of a strange public-house for a glass of ale or porter, to moisten what I had had for dinner, they were afraid...
Page 1283 - And it was very kind of you, my own darling," said I. " I felt it so much that I wouldn't on any account have even mentioned that you bought a Salmon which was too much for two. Or that it cost one pound six which was more than we can afford." "You enjoyed it very much," sobbed Dora.

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2010)

Charles Dickens (1812-1870) was one of England's greatest writers. Best known for his classic serialized novels, such as "Oliver Twist", "A Tale of Two Cities", and "Great Expectations", Dickens wrote about the London he lived in, the conditions of the poor, and the growing tensions between the classes. He achieved critical and popular international success in his lifetime and was honored with burial in Westminster Abbey.