Geology Underfoot in Yellowstone Country

Front Cover
Mountain Press Publishing Company, Incorporated, Apr 15, 2011 - Science - 302 pages
1 Review
Although it's also known for for wolves, bison, and stunning scenery, Yellowstone National Park was established as the world's first national park in 1872 largely because of its geological wonders. In Geology Underfoot in Yellowstone Country, author and geologist Marc Hendrix takes you to over twenty sites in the park and surrounding region that illustrate the deep-time story of Yellowstone Country, from its early existence as a seafloor hundreds of millions of years ago to an earthquake swarm in 2008 that caused some folks to wonder if the Yellowstone Volcano was going to blow its top—again. Besides covering icons such as Old Faithful and Mammoth Hot Springs, Geology Underfoot in Yellowstone Country visits sites that are less well known but just as mind blowing, including outcrops of rock deposited by superfast incendiary flows of hot ash; the glacially sculpted grandeur of the Beartooth and Absaroka mountains witnessed along the Beartooth Highway; and the deadly Madison landslide that killed twenty-eight people in 1959. With prose tooled for the lay reader and a multitude of colorful photos and illustrations, Geology Underfoot in Yellowstone Country will help you read the landscape the way a geologist does.

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: Geology Underfoot in Yellowstone Country

User Review  - Cathy Scholtens - Goodreads

What a fun nerdy book! If you are the least bit interested in geology, or have ever seen some rock formation and wondered "how did that happen?", this is the book for you! Head on over to Yellowstone fully informed and ready to increase your enjoyment ten-fold! Read full review

About the author (2011)

Growing up in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, Marc Hendrix developed an early love of geology while working as a field assistant for his father, Sherman, a biology professor at Gettysburg College. Marc received a bachelor's degree in geology from Wittenberg University in Springfield, Ohio, a master's degree in geology and geophysics from the University of Wisconsin, and a PhD in applied earth sciences from Stanford University. He joined the faculty at the University of Montana in 1994, where he has developed a field-based research program focused on the geology of the northern Rocky Mountains, including Yellowstone Country.

Bibliographic information