Poems on Various Subjects: But Chiefly Illustrative of the Events and Actors in the American War of Independence (Google eBook)

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J.R. Smith, 1861 - United States - 362 pages
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Page 310 - On yonder lake I spread the sail no more! Vigour, and youth, and active days are past Relentless demons urge me to that shore On whose black forests all the dead are cast: Ye solemn train, prepare the funeral song, For I must go to shades below, Where all is strange and all is new ; Companion to the airy throng ! What solitary streams, In dull and dreary dreams, All melancholy, must I rove along!
Page 336 - What wonders there shall freedom show, What mighty States successive grow ! From Europe's proud, despotic shores Hither the stranger takes his way, And in our new found world explores A happier soil, a milder sway, Where no proud despot holds him down, No slaves insult him with a crown.
Page 184 - Pearson, resolv'd to save the fleet, Stood off to sea these ships to meet. And closely brac'd his shivering sails. With him advanc'd the Countess bold, Like a black tar in wars grown old; And now these floating piles drew nigh ; But, muse, unfold what chief of fame In th
Page 90 - Dark was the sky. and not one friendly star Shone from the zenith or horizon, clear, Mist sate upon the woods, and darkness rode In her black chariot, with a wild career. And from the woods the late resounding note Issued of the loquacious Whip-poor-will, Hoarse, howling dogs, and nightly roving wolves Clamour'd from far off clifts invisible.
Page 48 - The Ohio soon shall glide by many a town Of note; and where the Mississippi stream, By forests shaded, now runs weeping on, Nations shall grow, and states not less in fame Than Greece and Rome of old! we too shall boast Our Scipio's, Solon's, Cato's, sages, chiefs That in the lap of time yet dormant lie, Waiting the joyous hour of life and light...
Page 336 - Great Sire of floods ! whose varied wave Through climes and countries takes its way, To whom creating Nature gave Ten thousand streams to swell thy sway ! No longer shall they useless prove, Nor idly through the forests rove...
Page 107 - At last he rais'd the swelling anthem high, In dismal numbers seem'd he to complain; The captive tribes that by Euphrates wept, Their song was jovial to his dreary strain. 130. That done, they plac'd the carcase in the tomb, To dust and dull oblivion now resign'd, Then turn'd the chariot tow'rd the House of Night, Which soon flew off, and left no trace behind.
Page 91 - There cedars dark, the osier, and the pine, Shorn tamarisks, and weeping willows grew, The poplar tall, the lotos, and the lime. And pyracantha did her leaves renew. 16 The poppy there, companion to repose, Display 'd her blossoms that began to fall, And here the purple amaranthus rose With mint strong-scented, for the funeral.
Page 223 - When a certain great king, whose initial is G, Shall force stamps upon paper, and folks to drink tea ; When these folks burn his tea and stampt paper, like stubble, You may guess that this king is then coming to trouble.
Page 185 - She felt the fury of her ball, Down, prostrate down, the Britons fall; The decks were strew'd with slain : Jones to the foe his vessel lash'd ; And, while the black artillery flash'd, Loud thunders shook the main.

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