The New-England Journal of Medicine and Surgery: And Collateral Branches of Science, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Walter Channing, John Ware
Wells and Lilly, 1812 - Medicine
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Page 131 - Assuming the existence of hydrogen in the amalgam of ammonium, its presence in one metallic compound evidently leads to the suspicion of its combination in others. And in the electrical powers of the different species of matter, there are circumstances which extend, the idea to combustible substances in general. Oxygen. is the only body which can be supposed to be elementary, attracted by the positive surface in the electrical circuit, and all compound bodies, the nature of which is known, that are...
Page 47 - And by the agencies of batteries sufficiently strong, and by the application of proper circumstances, there is no small reason to hope, that even these refractory bodies will yield their elements to the methods of analysis by electrical attraction and repulsion. In the electrical circuit we have a regular series of powers of decomposition, from an intensity of action, so feeble as scarcely to destroy the weakest affinity existing between the parts of...
Page 103 - ... 2. The infusion of tobacco when injected into the intestine, and the upas antiar when applied to a wound, have the power of rendering the heart insensible to the stimulus of the blood, thus stopping the circulation; in other words, they occasion syncope. 3. There is reason to believe that the poisons...
Page 133 - It rapidly effervesces and deliquesces in air, but can be preserved under naphtha, in which, however, it softens slowly, and seems partially to dissolve. When it is plunged under water filling an inverted jar, by means of a proper tube, it disappears instantly with effervescence, and the non-absorbable elastic fluid liberated is found to be hydrogen gas.
Page 77 - That when the brain is injured or removed, the action of the heart ceases only because respiration is under its influence ; and if, under these circumstances, respiration is artificially produced, the circulation will Still continue.
Page 210 - An inquiry into the process of nature in repairing injuries of the intestines, illustrating the treatment of penetrating wounds and strangulated hernia.
Page 107 - Observations on the Climate in Different Parts of America, compared with the Climate in Corresponding parts of the other continent.
Page 70 - ... kept up. I then secured the blood-vessels in the neck, and removed the head by cutting through the soft parts above the ligature, and separating the occiput from the atlas. The heart continued to contract, apparently with as much strength and frequency as in a living animal. I examined the blood in the different sets of vessels, and found it...
Page 103 - ... and from analogy, we may conclude that other poisons, when applied to wounds, operate in a similar manner. 5. When an animal is apparently dead from the influence of a poison, which acts by simply destroying the functions of the brain, it may, in some instances at least, be made to recover, if respiration is artificially produced and continued for a certain length of time.
Page 75 - Experiment 8. I procured two rabbits of the same size and colour : the temperature of the room was 64. I killed one of them by dividing the spinal marrow, and immediately, having made an opening into the left side of the thorax, I tied a ligature round the base of the heart, so as to stop the circulation. The wound in the skin was closed by a suture. An opening was then made into the trachea, and the apparatus for artificial respiration being fitted into it, the lungs were inflated, and then allowed...

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