A universal history of iniquity

Front Cover
Penguin, Jun 18, 2001 - Fiction - 104 pages
12 Reviews
Borges' first collection of stories (1935). In his writing, Borges always combined high seriousness with a wicked sense of fun. Here he reveals his delight in re-creating (or making up) colorful stories from the Orient, the Islamic world, and the Wild West, as well as his horrified fascination with knife fights, political and personal betrayal, and bloodthirsty revenge. Spark-ling with the sheer exuberant pleasure of story-telling, this collection marked the emergence of an utterly distinctive literary voice.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
2
4 stars
3
3 stars
5
2 stars
2
1 star
0

Review: A Universal History of Iniquity

User Review  - James - Goodreads

Perhaps I'm too underdone to appreciate this. Started reading it as part of Borge's 'Collected Ficciones,' but could not persevere throughout the entire compilation. As I delved deeper into the ... Read full review

Review: A Universal History of Iniquity

User Review  - Aidan Watson-Morris - Goodreads

immensely entertaining. i think that, reading these as they were published as installments, or just after they were collected, must've been incredible--the foretelling of arguably the most important ... Read full review

Contents

Preface to the First Edition
3
The Improbable Impostor Tom Castro
16
The Widow ChingPirate
23
Copyright

7 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2001)

Born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in 1899, Jorge Borges was educated by an English governess and later studied in Europe. He returned to Buenos Aires in 1921, where he helped to found several avant-garde literary periodicals. In 1955, after the fall of Juan Peron, whom he vigorously opposed, he was appointed director of the Argentine National Library. With Samuel Beckett he was awarded the $10,000 International Publishers Prize in 1961, which helped to establish him as one of the most prominent writers in the world. Borges regularly taught and lectured throughout the United States and Europe. His ideas have been a profound influence on writers throughout the Western world and on the most recent developments in literary and critical theory. A prolific writer of essays, short stories, and plays, Borges's concerns are perhaps clearest in his stories. He regarded people's endeavors to understand an incomprehensible world as fiction; hence, his fiction is metaphysical and based on what he called an esthetics of the intellect. Some critics have called him a mystic of the intellect. Dreamtigers (1960) is considered a masterpiece. A central image in Borges's work is the labyrinth, a mental and poetic construct, that he considered a universe in miniature, which human beings build and therefore believe they control but which nevertheless traps them. In spite of Borges's belief that people cannot understand the chaotic world, he continually attempted to do so in his writing. Much of his work deals with people's efforts to find the center of the labyrinth, symbolic of achieving understanding of their place in a mysterious universe. In such later works as The Gold of the Tigers, Borges wrote of his lifelong descent into blindness and how it affected his perceptions of the world and himself as a writer. Borges died in Geneva in 1986.

Bibliographic information