The British Essayists: With Prefaces, Historical and Biographical, Volume 6 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Alexander Chalmers
Little, Brown, 1864 - English essays
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents


Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 204 - Greek at his own table ; for which reason he desired a particular friend of his at the university to find him out a clergyman rather of plain sense than much learning, of a good aspect, a clear voice, a sociable temper, and, if possible, a man that understood a little of backgammon.
Page 31 - If we consider our own country in its natural prospect, without any of the benefits and advantages of commerce, what a barren, uncomfortable spot of earth falls to our share ! Natural historians tell us, that no fruit grows .originally among us besides hips and haws, acorns and pig-nuts, with other delicacies of the like nature ; that our climate of itself, and without the assistances of art...
Page 225 - ... the stage. Would an infinitely wise Being make such glorious creatures for so mean a purpose ? Can He delight in the production of such abortive intelligences, such short-lived reasonable beings ? Would He give us talents that are not to be exerted ? Capacities that are never to be gratified...
Page 212 - Will Wimble's is the case of many a younger brother of a great family, who had rather see their children starve like gentlemen, than thrive in a trade or profession that is beneath their quality.
Page 205 - Calamy, with several living authors, who have published discourses of practical divinity. I no sooner saw this venerable man in the pulpit, but I very much approved of my friend's insisting upon the qualifications of a good aspect and a clear voice ; for I was so charmed with the gracefulness of his figure and delivery, as well as with the discourses he pronounced, that I think I never passed any time more to my satisfaction. A sermon repeated after this manner, is like the composition of a poet...
Page 202 - ROGER'S Family, because it consists of sober and staid Persons; for as the Knight is the best Master in the World, he seldom changes his Servants; and as he is beloved by all about him, his Servants never care for leaving him: By this Means his Domesticks are all in Years, and grown old with their Master. You would take his Valet...
Page 130 - Man-like, but different sex ; so lovely fair, That what seem'd fair in all the world, seem'd now Mean, or in her summ'd up...
Page 58 - The noble earl was slain. He had a bow bent in his hand, Made of a trusty tree ; An arrow of a cloth-yard long Up to the head drew he...
Page 228 - He has often told me, that at his coming to his estate, he found his parishioners very irregular: and that in order to make them kneel, and join in the responses, he gave every one of them a hassock and a Common Prayer Book ; and at the same time employed an itinerant...
Page 35 - I never heard the old song of Percy and Douglas, that I found not my heart more moved than with a trumpet ; and yet it is sung by some blind Crowder with no rougher voice than rude style ; which being so evil apparelled in the dust and cobweb of that uncivil age, what would it work trimmed in the gorgeous eloquence of Pindar...

Bibliographic information