The Charismatic Community: Shi'ite Identity in Early Islam

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SUNY Press, Mar 8, 2007 - Religion - 323 pages
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The Charismatic Community examines the rise and development of Shi>ite religious identity in early Islamic history, analyzing the complex historical and intellectual processes that shaped the sense of individual and communal religious vocation. The book reveals the profound and continually evolving connection between the spiritual ideals of the Shi>ite movement and the practical processes of community formation. Author Maria Massi Dakake traces the Qurite Imam, >Ali b. Abi Talib. Dakake argues that walaμyah pertains not only to the charisma of the Shi>ite leadership and devotion to them, but also to solidarity and loyalty among the members of the community itself. She also looks at the ways in which doctrinal developments reflected and served the practical needs of the Shi>ite community, the establishment of identifiable boundaries and minimum requirements of communal membership, the meaning of women’s affiliation and identification with the Shi>ite movement, and Shi>ite efforts to engender a more normative and less confrontational attitude toward the non-Shi>ite Muslim community.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
The Principle of Walayah and the Origins of the Community
13
Walayah in the Islamic Tradition
15
The Ghadlr Khumm Tradition Walayah and the Spiritual Distinctions of Ali b Abi Talib
33
Walayah Authority and Religious Community in the First Civil War
49
The Shiite Community in the Aftermath of the First Civil War
71
Walayah Faith and the Charismatic Nature of Shiite Identity
101
Walayah as the Essence of Religion Theological Developments at the Turn of the Second Islamic Century
103
The Charismatic Nature and Spiritual Distinction of the Shiites
157
Creating a Community within a Community
175
Shiites and NonShi ites The Distinction between Iman and Islam
177
Degrees of Faith Establishing a Hierarchy within the Shiite Community
191
Rarer than Red Sulfur Womens Identity in Early Shiism
213
Perforated Boundaries Establishing Two Codes of Conduct
237
Notes
253
Bibliography
301

Membership in the Shiite Community and Salvation
125
Predestination and the Mythological Origins of Shiite Identity
141

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About the author (2007)

Maria Massi Dakake is Associate Professor of Religious Studies at George Mason University.

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