Emma (Google eBook)

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Emma

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Contents

I
1
II
10
III
15
IV
20
V
29
VI
35
VII
42
VIII
49
XXIX
219
XXX
228
XXXI
234
XXXII
239
XXXIII
249
XXXIV
257
XXXV
266
XXXVI
272

IX
60
X
73
XI
80
XII
86
XIII
95
XIV
103
XV
110
XVI
118
XVII
124
XVIII
127
XIX
135
XX
142
XXI
149
XXII
159
XXIII
164
XXIV
173
XXV
181
XXVI
187
XXVII
204
XXVIII
213
XXXVII
280
XXXIX
283
XL
295
XLI
300
XLII
306
XLIII
314
XLIV
328
XLV
337
XLVI
344
XLVII
351
XLVIII
360
XLIX
371
L
379
LI
388
LII
397
LIII
404
LIV
413
LV
421
LVI
431

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Page 3 - Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever and rich, with a comfortable home and happy disposition, seemed to unite some of the best blessings of existence, and had lived nearly twenty-one years in the world with very little to distress or vex her.
Page 74 - And then their uncle comes in, and tosses them up to the ceiling in a very frightful way." " But they like it, papa ; there is nothing they like so much. It is such enjoyment to them, that if their uncle did not lay down the rule of their taking turns, which ever began would never give way to the other.
Page 437 - But in spite of these deficiencies, the wishes, the hopes, the confidence, the> predictions of the small band of true friends who witnessed the ceremony were fully answered in the perfect happiness of the union.
Page 295 - Jane; I left her dancing with Mr George Otway; she will love to tell you all about it herself to-morrow: her first partner was Mr Elton; I do not know who will ask her next, perhaps Mr William Cox.' My dear sir, you are too obliging. Is there nobody you would not rather? I am not helpless. Sir, you are most kind. Upon my word, Jane on one arm, and me on the other. Stop, stop, let us stand a little back, Mrs Elton is going; dear Mrs Elton, how elegant she looks — beautiful lace. Now we all follow...
Page 20 - She was not struck by any thing remarkably clever in Miss Smith's conversation, but she found her altogether very engaging— not inconveniently shy, not unwilling to talk— and yet so far from pushing, shewing so proper and becoming a deference, seeming so pleasantly grateful for being admitted to Hartfield, and so artlessly impressed by the appearance of every thing in so superior a style to what she had been used to, that she must have good sense, and deserve encouragement.
Page 18 - ... a real, honest, old-fashioned boarding-school, where a reasonable quantity of accomplishments were sold at a reasonable price, and where girls might be sent to be out of the way, and scramble themselves into a little education, without any danger of coming back prodigies.
Page 20 - She was a very pretty girl, and her beauty happened to be of a sort which Emma particularly admired. She was short, plump, and fair, with a fine bloom, blue eyes, light hair, regular features, and a look of great sweetness...
Page 135 - To take a dislike to a young man, only because he appeared to be of a different disposition from himself, was unworthy the real liberality of mind which she was always used to acknowledge in him; for with all the high opinion of himself, which she had often laid to his charge, she had never before for a moment supposed it could make him unjust to the merit of another.
Page 349 - Mrs. Churchill, after being disliked at least twenty-five years, was now spoken of with compassionate allowances. In one point she was fully justified. She had never been admitted before to be seriously ill. The event acquitted her of all the fancifulness and all the selfishness of imaginary complaints.
Page 296 - I was telling you of your grandmamma, Jane ; there was a little disappointment. The baked apples and biscuits — excellent in their way, you know ; but there was a delicate fricassee of sweetbread and some asparagus brought in at first, and good Mr. Woodhouse, not thinking the asparagus quite boiled enough, sent it all out again. Now there is nothing grandmamma loves better than sweetbread and asparagus, so she was rather disappointed...

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