Rootabaga Stories (Google eBook)

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Harcourt, Brace and Company, 1922 - Children's stories - 230 pages
16 Reviews
Presents Sandburg's fanciful, humorous tales peopled with such characters as the Potato Face Blind Man, the Blue Wind Boy, and many others.
  

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Review: Rootabaga Stories, Part Two

User Review  - Jori Richardson - Goodreads

"Rootabaga Stories" reminded me of Dr. Seuss, without as many illustrations and written for children a bit older. I can see it as being a wonderful read aloud, as the story skips along in melodious ... Read full review

Review: Rootabaga Stories

User Review  - Richard Epstein - Goodreads

Sandburg was every bit as good an author of children's stories as he was a poet or a biographer. Read full review

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Page 210 - In the first week of the harvest moon coming up red and changing to yellow and silver the corn fairies sit by thousands between the corn rows weaving and stitching the clothes they have to wear next winter, next spring, next summer. They sit cross-legged when they sew. And it is a law among them each one must point the big toe at the moon while sewing the harvest moon clothes. When the moon comes up red as blood early in the evening they point their big toes slanting toward the east. Then towards...
Page 29 - Um-mmm," said the other three uncles. "Now the people in the village all understand the winds with their wind songs in summer and winter. And they understand the rough wind who comes sometimes and picks up the village and blows it away off high in the sky all by itself. "If you go to the public square in the middle of the village you will see a big roundhouse. If you take the top off the roundhouse you will see a big spool with a long string winding up around the spool. "Now whenever the rough wind...
Page 53 - who pass by here going into the post office and coming out, they have eyes— but they see nothing with their eyes. They look where they are going and they get where they wish to get, but they forget why they came and they do not know how to come away. They are my blind brothers. It is for them I have the sign that reads, "I Am Blind Too.
Page 3 - How They Broke Away to Go to the Rootabaga Country Gimme the Ax lived in a house where everything is the same as it always was. "The chimney sits on top of the house and lets the smoke out," said Gimme the Ax. "The doorknobs open the doors. The windows are always either open or shut. We are always either upstairs or downstairs in this house. Everything is the same as it always was.
Page 3 - The chimney sits on top of the house and lets the smoke out," said Gimme the Ax. "The doorknobs open the doors. The windows are always either open or shut. We are always either upstairs or downstairs in this house. Everything is always the same as it always was.
Page 11 - DO you wish a ticket to go away and come back, or do you wish a ticket to go away and never come back?" If Carl Sandburg's sleepy eyed ticket agent had been sitting in a window of The Bookman office in New York in the year 1918 and had asked me that question, I should have snatched WH Hudson's "Little Boy Lost" and Hendrik Van Loon's "Short History of Discovery
Page 228 - The train jumped off the tracks down into the valley and cut across in a straight line on a cut-off, jumped on the tracks again and went on toward Ohio. The conductor said, "If you are going to jump the train off the tracks, tell us about it beforehand.
Page 4 - The first words they speak as soon as they learn to make words shall be their names," he said. "They shall name themselves." When the first boy came to the house of Gimme the Ax, he was named Please Gimme. When the first girl came she was named Ax Me No Questions. And both of the children had the shadows of valleys by night in their eyes and the lights of early morning, when the sun is coming up, on their foreheads. And the hair on top of their heads was a dark wild grass. And they loved to turn...
Page 139 - It must not be a child standing still all its life on a street corner. Yes, if we have a child she must be free to run across the prairie, to the mountains, to the sea. Yes, it must be a free child.
Page 18 - And so if you are going to the Rootabaga Country you will know when you get there because the railroads change from straight to zigzag, the pigs have bibs on and it is the fathers and mothers who fix it.

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