Unplanned Suburbs: Toronto's American Tragedy, 1900 to 1950

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JHU Press, Oct 7, 1999 - Architecture - 356 pages
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It is widely believed that only the growth of mass suburbs after World War II brought suburban living within reach of blue-collar workers, immigrants, and racial minorities. But in this original and intensive study of Toronto, Richard Harris shows that even prewar suburbs were socially and ethnically diverse, with a significant number of lower-income North American families making their homes on the urban fringe. In the United States and Canada, lack of planning set the stage for a uniquely North American tragedy. Unplanned Suburbs serves as a reminder of the dangers of unchecked suburban growth.

  

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Contents

Introduction
1
The Rise of Metropolitan Suburbs
21
the Factory Lead the Way?
51
A City of Homes
86
CHAPTERS The End Justified the Means
109
Civic Efficiency and Suburban Freedom
141
The Rhetoric and Reality of Community Building
168
CHAPTERS A Romance of Common Life
200
The Fall of the Unplanned Suburb
233
Conclusion
264
Property Assessment Records
287
Social Class and the Classification of Occupations
293
Index
349
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

Richard Harris is a professor of geography at McMaster University, Ontario. He is the author of Democracy in Kingston: A Social Movement in Urban Politics.

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