Historical Consciousness: The Remembered Past (Google eBook)

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Transaction Publishers, 1968 - History - 411 pages
2 Reviews

One of the most important developments of Western civilization has been the growth of historical consciousness. Consciously or not, history has become a form of thought applied to every facet of human experience; every field of human action can be studied, described, or understood through its history. In this extraordinary analysis of the meaning of the remembered past, John Lukacs discusses the evolution of historical consciousness since its first emergence about three centuries ago.

  

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Review: Historical Consciousness: The Remembered Past

User Review  - Jeff Polaski - Goodreads

Historical Consciousness: The Remembered Past, by John A. Lukacs Professor Lukacs writes using his historical philosophy, rather than the usual and overworked philosophy of history. This is one of his ... Read full review

Review: Historical Consciousness: The Remembered Past

User Review  - Sena.k-93hotmail.com - Goodreads

good Read full review

Contents

III
2
IV
51
V
99
VI
129
VIII
172
IX
225
X
274
XI
317
XII
325
XIII
362
XIV
398
XV
404
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Page 18 - The common remark as to the utility of reading history being made; — JOHNSON. "We must consider how very little history there is; I mean real authentick history. That certain Kings reigned, and certain battles were fought, we can depend upon as true ; but all the colouring, all the philosophy of history is conjecture.
Page xii - Think now History has many cunning passages, contrived corridors And issues, deceives with whispering ambitions, Guides us by vanities. Think now She gives when our attention is distracted And what she gives, gives with such supple confusions That the giving famishes the craving. Gives too late "What's not believed in, or if still believed, In memory only, reconsidered passion. Gives too soon Into weak hands, what's thought can be dispensed with Till the refusal propagates a fear. Think Neither fear...

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