Fundamentals of Logic Design

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Cengage Learning, Mar 13, 2009 - Technology - 758 pages
4 Reviews
Updated with modern coverage and a streamlined presentation, this sixth edition achieves yet again an unmatched balance between theory and application. Authors Charles H. Roth, Jr. and Larry L. Kinney carefully present the theory that is necessary for understanding the fundamental concepts of logic design while not overwhelming students with the mathematics of switching theory. Divided into 20 easy-to-grasp study units, the book covers such fundamental concepts as Boolean algebra, logic gates design, flip-flops, and state machines. By combining flip-flops with networks of logic gates, students will learn to design counters, adders, sequence detectors, and simple digital systems. After covering the basics, this text presents modern design techniques using programmable logic devices and the VHDL hardware description language.
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About the author (2009)

Charles H. Roth received his B.E.E., M.S., and PhD degrees in Electrical Engineering from the University of Minnesota, M.I.T., and Stanford. He joined the faculty of the University of Texas at Austin in 1961, where he is currently Professor Emeritus of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Dr. Roth received the General Dynamics award for outstanding engineering teaching after he developed a self-paced course in logic design. His teaching and research interests include digital systems theory and design, microcomputer systems, and VHDL applications. He is the author of four textbooks including Fundamentals of Logic Design 5e.

Larry L. Kinney is a Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies at the University of Minnesota. He received his Ph.D in Electrical Engineering from the University of Iowa in 1968. His research concerns digital system and digital computer design, specifically concurrent error detection techniques, testing of logic and design, distributed computer systems, computer architectures, error detecting/correcting codes, and applications of microprocessors.

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