Israela

Front Cover
Tate Publishing, Aug 16, 2011 - Fiction - 380 pages
8 Reviews
In my heart, I call to their mothers, 'Take your sons to your houses. Bind them to your chairs; gag them, blindfold them if necessary until they grow calm. Then teach them, for they have forgotten, about peace, about the blessed life, about a future—a present—without pain.' Beneath their prayers, in their morning cups of coffee, beneath their love-making and their child-rearing, and in their sorrow, especially in their sorrow when burying their dead, I hear the simmering of heating souls; I smell the charge of armies, of lives exploding uselessly into smithereens. I sit in mourning over a disaster still to come. In Israel, the lives of three women interweave with the story of their country. Ratiba, an Israeli journalist, turns her back on her heritage to marry an Israeli Arab. Her sister Orit, an actor, lives alone and longs for her lost sister. Elisheva is a nurse who dedicates her life to the wounded and the dying. As their lives unfold, the three women find themselves facing choices they would never have envisioned. This is a story of secrets and alienation, yet also of hope and heroism. It is about Arabs who save Jews from disaster and Jews who heal Arabs. It is the story of everyday people torn and desperately searching for the right path. Here, the ancient pulsates in present time and the biblical holds prominence with the secular. Beneath this modern-day drama unfolds the story of a land and its people, revealing the historical trajectory of two peoples, victims and perpetrators of a biblical curse 'This perceptive, poignant novel offers a fresh and essential outlook on Israel. With memorable characters and an abundance of drama, Israela is gripping reading.' – Lou Aronica, New York Times bestselling author
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - USCLibrary - LibraryThing

Lovely but confusing. This book is structured so that the three main characters (Ratiba, Orit and Elisheva) take turns narrating. I've read books where this works, but here the chapters are so short ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - KWoman - LibraryThing

Interesting story-tends to get a little "busy" at times, so makes it hard to follow storyline. Enjoyed it overall, however. Strong research is obvious throughout the book. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
9
Section 2
34
Section 3
40
Section 4
49
Section 5
56
Section 6
70
Section 7
77
Section 8
85
Section 24
220
Section 25
237
Section 26
239
Section 27
240
Section 28
243
Section 29
252
Section 30
258
Section 31
272

Section 9
98
Section 10
99
Section 11
102
Section 12
120
Section 13
122
Section 14
131
Section 15
150
Section 16
158
Section 17
175
Section 18
178
Section 19
188
Section 20
189
Section 21
193
Section 22
204
Section 23
218
Section 32
273
Section 33
294
Section 34
318
Section 35
320
Section 36
322
Section 37
333
Section 38
336
Section 39
337
Section 40
338
Section 41
344
Section 42
345
Section 43
350
Section 44
351
Section 45
356
Copyright

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