The End of Certainty: Power, Politics, and Business in Australia

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Allen & Unwin, 1994 - Australia - 758 pages
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This text is about power, personality and national destiny. It is the inside story of how Australia was governed by Bob Hawke and Paul Keating during the 1980s. The decade was dominated by Hawke's victories, Keating's economics and the spectacular transition of these men from allies to enemies. The book covers the disarray within the Liberal and National Parties, the contest between Andrew Peacock and John Howard, the Jobs-for-Canberra push and John Elliott's dalliance with power. It explains how Australia fell into recession and who is to blame for the 1980s financial furnace.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
The new Labor Party
19
The revolt against the Liberal tradition
34
the Accord
54
the float
76
The Liberal revolution
95
The attack on Justice Higgins
111
Beyond White Australiaa new identity
124
A competitive economy
386
The Elliott emergence
399
Howardthe social agenda
418
The Kirribilli pact
434
Elliott denied
457
The Peacock coup
467
Towards the recession
487
1990WHY LABOR
507

The Tax Summit
155
The Peacock surrender
178
The banana republic
196
The Howard leadership
228
The New Right
252
Consensus business and unions
271
the false prophet
291
The conservative crisis
315
Hawke strikes
329
HawkeLabors greatest winner
342
BOOM AND BUST
359
The 1980s boom
361
The Liberals falter
509
Green power
524
The Labor revival
544
The 1990 campaign
565
Why Labor won
585
EPILOGUE INTO THE 1990s
595
Hewsonthe freemarket purist
597
The Keating coup
615
The end of certainty
660
Endnotes
687
Index
707
Copyright

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Page 10 - Australian democracy has come to look upon the State as a vast public utility, whose duty it is to provide the greatest happiness for the greatest number.
Page 8 - ... light, clothes, boots, furniture, utensils, rates, life insurance, savings, accident or benefit societies, loss of employment, union pay, books and newspapers, tram or train fares, sewing machine, mangle, school requisites, amusements and holidays, liquors, tobacco, sickness or death, religion or charity, I could not certify that any wages less than 42s.
Page 245 - ... masses. It is to be found in the homes of people who are nameless and unadvertised, and who, whatever their individual religious conviction or dogma, see in their children their greatest contribution to the immortality of their race.
Page 196 - Government can't get the adjustment, get manufacturing going again, and keep moderate wage outcomes and a sensible economic policy, then Australia is basically done for. We will end up being a third-rate economy.
Page 203 - I place economy among the first and most important virtues, and public debt as the greatest of dangers to be feared. To preserve our independence, we must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt. We must make our choice between economy and liberty, or profusion and servitude.
Page 3 - The unity of Australia is nothing, if that does not imply a united race. A united race means not only that its members can intermix, intermarry and associate without degradation on either side, but implies one inspired by the same ideas, and an aspiration towards the same ideals, of a people possessing the same general cast of character, tone of thought the same constitutional training and traditions...
Page 10 - To the Australian, the State means collective power at the service of individualistic 'rights.' Therefore he sees no opposition between his individualism and his reliance upon Government.
Page xix - Aborigines illustrates the first stages of the conflagration of oppression and conflict which was, over the following century, to spread across the continent to dispossess, degrade and devastate the Aboriginal peoples and leave a national legacy of unutterable shame.
Page 9 - I face the possibilities of this mine remaining closed, with all its grave consequences; but the fate of Australia is not dependent on the fate of any one mine, or of any one company ; if it is a calamity that this historic mine should close down, it would be a still greater calamity that men should be underfed or degraded.

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About the author (1994)

Paul Kelly was editor of the "Australian" during the early 1990s.

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