History of the Second Regiment New Hampshire Volunteers: Its Camps, Marches and Battles (Google eBook)

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C. F. Livingston, Printer, 1865 - United States - 223 pages
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Page i - And have marched and fought in all kinds of weather, And hungry and full we have been ; Had days of battle, and days of rest, But this memory I cling to and love the best, We have drunk from the same canteen...
Page 223 - Let it suffice to say they did their part as became sons of the Old Granite State. For our fallen braves who have so gloriously perished fighting for their country we drop a comrade's tear, while we would extend our heartfelt sympathy to those dear ones far away, who find the ties of kindred and friends thus rudely severed, and for those who must suffer untold agony and pain through long weeks of convalescence, our earnest sympathy, yet leaving them to the watchful care of Him who will not prove...
Page 81 - Yes; my boys are great on intrenchments," replied the Colonel. "Do you think you will be attacked ? " " Well, we may be ; they are at it pretty brisk on the right." " How many men would it take to drive you out of here?" "How many? Well, six thousand might, possibly, but five thousand would get killed doing it." The pluck of the boys would have made good the Colonel's words, had there been occasion to display it. The position of the Second was unassailed, and the regiment witnessed- one of the most...
Page 226 - LOAN PERIOD 1 HOME USE 4 2 3 5 6 ALL BOOKS MAY BE RECAUED AFTER 7 DAYS RrNI ""' , . . - ..''- .r," o> . ^) T LC,- ir . " .."....-.
Page 109 - On the first of September the rebels attempted to get possession of the road between Centreville and Fairfax, and the divisions of Hooker, Kearney and Stevens, were sent to the threatened point. The battle of Chantilly ensued, and the rebels were driven back; but Kearney and Stevens were both killed.
Page 24 - Now," he exclaimed, "the New Hampshire Second will have a chance to show what it is made of...
Page 129 - ... feeling and appropriate speech, which was responded to by Lieut. Colonel Bailey. After the eating had been finished Hon. Frederick Smyth was introduced as toast-master, when sentiments and short speeches, by men of the regiment and citizens, followed. The next day the regiment was received at Concord, by a grand procession, dinner at the hotels and speeches of welcome. Gen. Wool was there to add to the interest of the occasion. The headquarters of the regiment were established at Concord, while...
Page 15 - ... ranks, yielding to a fatigue which no exuberance of patriotism could withstand. The woods along the road had been cut down to allow free range to our guns, and the blazing sun thus had equally free, range on our weary columns. At night the brigade bivouacked at Bailey's Cross Roads. Soon after starting, the next morning, evidences of the recent occupation of the country by the rebels began to appear in the numerous trees felled across the road, to obstruct the advance of the Union troops. Later...
Page 222 - ... as they went, I rejoined the brigade at about 6.30 pm, fearfully diminished in numbers, yet firm and fearless still. This battalion entered the fight with a firm determination to do or die, and the long lists of fallen comrades already submitted will show how well that resolution was kept, When all did so well it would be invidious to make comparisons. Let it suffice to say they did their part as became sons of the Old Granite State.
Page 33 - About the middle of October, Hooker's brigade was ordered to the lower Potomac, where the rebels had established a blockade of the river, which was severely felt at the capital. Sickles...

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