In the Hand of Dante: A Novel (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Little, Brown, Sep 4, 2002 - Fiction - 384 pages
69 Reviews
Deep inside the Vatican library, a priest discovers the rarest and most valuable art object ever found: the manuscript of "The Divine Comedy," written in Dante's own hand. Via Sicily, the manuscript makes its way from the priest to a mob boss in New York City, where a writer named Nick Tosches is called to authenticate the prize. For this writer, the temptation is too great: he steals the manuscript in a last-chance bid to have it all. Some will find it offensive; others will declare it transcendent; it is certain to be the most ragingly debated novel of the decade.
  

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Review: In the Hand of Dante

User Review  - Goodreads

Okay, time for a revised, and reevaluated review: In the Hand of Dante is a wildly inconsistent novel. It shifts so radically in prose that it sometimes makes you wonder if it was written by one ... Read full review

Review: In the Hand of Dante

User Review  - Seth Lindsey - Goodreads

Okay, time for a revised, and reevaluated review: In the Hand of Dante is a wildly inconsistent novel. It shifts so radically in prose that it sometimes makes you wonder if it was written by one ... Read full review

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About the author (2002)

Born in Newark & schooled in his father's bar, Nick Tosches is one of the most original & individualistic writers at work today. He is the author of acclaimed biographies of Sonny Liston, (The Devil & Sonny Liston), Dean Martin (Dino), the Mafia financier Michele Sindona (Power on Earth), & Jerry Lee Lewis (Hellfire); of several books about popular music (Country & Unsung Heroes of Rock 'n' Roll); & of the novels "Trinities" & "Cut Numbers". Thirty years of his writing was recently collected into "The Nick Tosches Reader" (Da Capo). He is a contributing editor of "Vanity Fair". He lives in New York City, & his poetry readings are legend.

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