The Sorrows of Satan: Or, The Strange Experience of One Geoffrey Tempest, Millionaire (Google eBook)

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American News Company, 1895 - 471 pages
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The Sorrows of Satan was a thought provoking book for me. I truly enjoyed reading it and will probably read it again in the future.
The main character, Geoffrey Tempest, is tempted by Satan who
is disguised as a friend only wanting to help Mr. Tempest. Throughout the book we find hints as to the true identity of the "friend." There are wonderful truths pointed out in this book and it is entertaining. 

Selected pages

Contents

I
5
II
16
III
21
IV
30
V
45
VI
57
VII
72
VIII
85
XXIII
254
XXIV
266
XXV
282
XXVI
291
XXVII
303
XXVIII
319
XXIX
332
XXX
345

IX
96
X
107
XI
118
XII
134
XIII
143
XIV
155
XV
162
XVI
174
XVII
189
XVIII
203
XIX
216
XX
225
XXI
237
XXII
248
XXXI
359
XXXII
365
XXXIII
370
XXXIV
378
XXXV
386
XXXVI
401
XXXVII
411
XXXVIII
420
XXXIX
431
XL
441
XLI
453
XLII
460
Copyright

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Page 373 - A thousand liveried angels lackey her, Driving far off each thing of sin and guilt, And in clear dream, and solemn vision, Tell her of things that no gross ear can hear, Till oft converse with heavenly habitants Begin to cast a beam on the outward shape, The unpolluted temple of the mind, And turns it by degrees to the soul's essence, Till all be made immortal...
Page 373 - Heaven is saintly chastity, that, when a soul is found sincerely so, a thousand. liveried angels lackey her, driving far off each thing of sin and guilt, and, in clear dream and solemn vision, tell her of things that no gross ear can hear; till oft converse with heavenly habitants begin to cast a beam on the outward shape, the unpolluted temple of the mind, and turns it by degrees to the soul's essence, till all be made immortal.
Page 170 - You can lead a horse to the water, but you cannot make him drink.
Page 393 - ... thee ; What children now but curses come ? What manhood in that God can be Who sees their worship, and is dumb ? No soul that lived, loved, wrought, and died, Is this their carrion crucified. Nay, if their God and thou be one, If thou and this thing be the same, Thou shouldst not look upon the sun ; The sun grows haggard at thy name. Come down, be done with, cease, give o'er ; Hide thyself, strive not, be no more.
Page 99 - I am one of those who think the fame of Millais as an artist was marred when he degraded himself to the level of painting the little green boy blowing bubbles of Pears soap.
Page 392 - So when our souls look back to thee They sicken, seeing against thy side, Too foul to speak of or to see, The leprous likeness of a bride, Whose kissing lips through his lips grown Leave their God rotten to the bone.
Page 107 - ... etc. From a popular novelist : I was entirely indifferent as to the results of the game, caring nothing at all as to whether I had losses or gains. Cut out the first "as" in "as to," and the second "as to" altogether, and the sentence begins to be prose "I was indifferent to the results of the game, caring nothing whether I had losses or gains.
Page 473 - This is Mrs. Alexander's best story, and readers of her two previous novels, * For His Sake' and " Found Wanting/ will at once recognize this as high praise. It is an English story. The plot is good, is skilfully developed ; the dialogue is bright, the situations, many of them, dramatic. On the whole, it is a bright, entertaining novel, and one of the best of the season.
Page 202 - All the same, you must not look upon me as an innocent young girl, Geoffrey, a girl such as the great poets indealized and sang of. I am a contaminated creature, trained to perfection in the lax morals and prurient literature of my day.
Page 228 - I am certain that calumny and misrepresentation, though it may move me to compassion, cannot disturb my peace. 1 shall understand the expressive silence of those sagacious enemies who dare not trust themselves to speak. I shall endeavour to extract from the midst of insult and contempt, and maledictions, those admonitions which may tend to correct whatever imperfections such...

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