Racial Oppression in the Global Metropolis: A Living Black Chicago History

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Rowman & Littlefield, Jan 1, 2007 - Social Science - 313 pages
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This study surveys metropolitan anti-black racism in 20th and 21st century Chicago. It illustrates stark racial inequality in and around contemporary global (corporate-neoliberal) Chicago. It explains apartheid and disparity in terms of persistently and deeply racist societal and institutional practices and policies. It criticizes neoconservative and liberal explanations of the black urban crisis, challenges some observers' overly sharp distinction between present and past racism and proposes ideas for challenging urban neoliberal racism in the 21st century.
  

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Contents

Itll Take More Than a Hurricane Race Place Chicago and Americas Enduring Shame
3
Whitewashing Global Chicago Racial Invisibility in the Neoliberal Era
31
HISTORY THE NOT SO GOOD OLD GHETTO
67
The First and Only True Ghetto
69
The Second Golden Age Ghetto
97
The Nadir The Third and Apocalyptic Ghetto and the Retreat from Race
131
STILL SEPARATE UNEQUAL THE UGLY DETAILS OF RECENT RACIAL DOMINATION
157
Metropolitan Apartheid
159
Savage Inequalities The Cold Facts
193
Whats Racism Got to Do with It?
229
Contesting Corporate Urban Neoliberal Racism
285
Index
303
About the Author
313
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Paul Street was the Vice President for Research and Planning and Director of Research at The Chicago Urban League and is currently an independent policy researcher and journalist in Iowa City. He is the author of Empire and Inequality: America and the World Since 9/11 and Segregated Schools: Educational Apartheid in the Post-Civil Rights Era. Street writes regularly for Z Magazine, Black Agenda Report, and Dissident Voice.

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