Women's Secrets: A Translation of Pseudo-Albertus Magnus' De Secretis Mulierum with Commentaries

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Helen Rodnite Lemay
SUNY Press, Oct 14, 1992 - Biography & Autobiography - 200 pages
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Women’s Secrets provides the first modern translation of the notorious treatise De secretis mulierum, popular throughout the late middle ages and into modern times. The Secrets deals with human reproduction and was written to instruct celibate medieval monks on the facts of life and some of the ways of the universe. However, the book had a much more far-reaching influence. Lemay shows how its message that women were evil, lascivious creatures built on the misogyny of the work’s Aristotelian sources and laid the groundwork for serious persecution of women.

Both the content of the treatise and the reputation of its author (erroneously believed to be Albertus Magnus) inspired a few medieval scholars to compose lengthy commentaries on the text, substantial selections from which are included, providing further evidence of how medieval men interpreted science and viewed the female body.
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - maryoverton - LibraryThing

Beware the female. WOMEN'S SERCRETS, composed in the late 13th or early 14th century by a disciple of theologian & scientist Albertus Magnus, is intended as a scholarly study on female sexuality and ... Read full review

Review: Women's Secrets: A Translation of Pseudo-Albertus Magnus' de Secretis Mulierum with Commentaries

User Review  - Mary Overton - Goodreads

Composed in the late 13th or early 14th century by a disciple of theologian & scientist Albertus Magnus, the book is intended as a scholarly study on female sexuality and obstetrics, "partly ... Read full review

Contents

VII
63
VIII
78
IX
91
X
95
XI
100
XII
111
XIII
120
XIV
123
XVI
128
XVII
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XVIII
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XIX
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XX
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XXI
181
XXII
195
Copyright

XV
126

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