Argument of Horace Binney, Esq., in the Case of Vidal V. the City of Philadelphia: In the Supreme Court of the United States, February, 1844 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
C. Sherman, printer, 1844 - Charitable bequests - 144 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 29 - And he answered, and said unto them, My mother and my brethren are these, which hear the word of God, and do it.
Page 30 - Upon the first day of the week let every one of you lay by him in store, as God hath prospered him, that there be no gatherings when I come.
Page 121 - I thank God, there are no free schools nor printing, and I hope we shall not have these hundred years. For learning has brought disobedience and heresy, and sects into the world, and printing has divulged them, and libels against the best government. God keep us from both"!
Page 66 - ... that all the instructors and teachers in the College shall take pains to instil into the minds of the scholars, the purest principles of morality, so that, on their entrance into active life, they may from inclination and habit, evince benevolence towards their fellow creatures, and a love of truth, sobriety, and industry, adopting at the same time such religious tenets as their matured reason may enable them to prefer.
Page 66 - I do not mean to cast any reflection upon any sect or person whatsoever; but, as there is such a multitude of sects, and such a diversity of opinion amongst them, I desire to keep the tender minds of the orphans, who are to derive advantage from this bequest, free from the excitement which clashing doctrines and sectarian controversy are so apt to produce.
Page 8 - Pennsylvania charged as aforesaid) unto the Mayor, Aldermen, and Citizens of Philadelphia their successors and assigns, in trust to and for the several uses intents and purposes hereinafter mentioned and declared of and concerning the same, that is to say...
Page 33 - Personal estate was vested by will in trustees, to be from time to time for ever applied " in the purchasing of such books, as by a proper disposition of them under the following directions might have a tendency to promote the interests of virtue and religion, and the happiness of mankind...
Page 110 - BECAUSE no People can be truly happy, though under the greatest Enjoyment of Civil Liberties, if abridged of the Freedom of their Consciences, as to their Religious Profession and Worship: And Almighty God being the only Lord of Conscience, Father of Lights and Spirits ; and the Author as well as Object of all divine Knowledge, Faith and Worship, who only doth enlighten the Minds, and persuade and convince the Understandings of People, I do hereby grant and declare.
Page 132 - ... nor can any man be justly deprived or abridged of any civil right as a citizen, on account of his religious sentiments, or peculiar mode of religious worship; and that no authority can, or ought to be vested in, or assumed by, any power whatever, that shall in any case interfere with, or in any manner control the rights of conscience, in the free exercise of religious worship.
Page 69 - I enjoin and require that no ecclesiastic, missionary, or minister of any sect whatsoever, shall ever hold or exercise any station or duty whatever in the said College; nor shall any such person ever be admitted for any purpose, or as a visitor, within the premises appropriated to the purposes of the said College.

Bibliographic information