Merlin's daughters: contemporary women writers of fantasy

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Greenwood Press, 1987 - Literary Criticism - 185 pages
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The relationship between fantasy and the feminine is explored in this compelling study of women writers of the genre. Spivak provides a revisioning of such archetypes as the wizard, the hero, and the dragon, and considers why women writers are currently dominating this field formerly occupied almost exclusively by men, as well as how women readers identify with the enchanted quest. Chapters provide a feminist perspective and analysis of leading women fantasists of the past two decades as well as promising new voices.

The relationship between fantasy and the feminine is explored in this compelling study of women writers of the genre. Spivak provides a revisioning of such archetypes as the wizard, the hero, and the dragon, and considers why women writers are currently dominating this field formerly occupied almost exclusively by men, as well as how women readers identify with the enchanted quest. Chapters provide a feminist perspective and analysis of leading women fantasists of the past two decades as well as promising new voices.

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Contents

Fantasy and the Feminine
3
Andre Norton
17
Susan Cooper
35
Copyright

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About the author (1987)

CHARLOTTE SPIVACK is Professor of English at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.