Doctors Talking with Patients/patients Talking with Doctors: Improving Communication in Medical Visits

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Greenwood Publishing Group, Jan 1, 2006 - Health & Fitness - 238 pages
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Medical visits are often less effective and satisfying than they would be if doctors and patients better understood the communication most needed for attainment of mutual health goals. Here, professors of medicine and psychology join forces to help us understand this vital issue, and the means to best facilitate communication that brings more effective medical care and happier, healthier consumers. The verbal and nonverbal exchanges that take place between doctor and patient affect both participants, and can result in a range of positive or negative psychological reactions - including comfort, alarm, irritation, or resolve. The authors set out specific principles and recommendations for improving doctor-patient relationships. They describe the process of communication, analyse social and psychological factors that colour doctor-patient exchanges, and detail changes that can benefit both parties.
  

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Doctors talking with patients/patients talking with doctors: improving communication in medical visits

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For this thoroughly updated and expanded second edition of a 1992 book, Roter (health & policy management, Johns Hopkins Univ.) and Hall (psychology, Northeastern Univ.) draw on their studies in the ... Read full review

Contents

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VI
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VIII
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IX
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XIII
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XIV
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Copyright

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Page 210 - Giving the patient his medical record: A proposal to improve the system.
Page 212 - The changing pool of international medical graduates seeking certification training in US graduate medical education programs", The Journal of the Medical Association (JAMA), September 4, Vol.

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About the author (2006)

DEBRA L. ROTER holds a dual appointment as Professor of Health Policy and Management at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, and at the Johns Hopkins Schools of Medicine and Nursing.

JUDITH A. HALL is Professor of Psychology at Northeastern University.

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