A systematic arrangement of Lord Coke's First Institute of the laws of England: on the plan of Sir Matthew Hale's analysis, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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R.H. Small, 1827 - Land tenure
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Page 780 - ... of and in such like estates as they had or shall have in use trust or confidence of or in the same.
Page 102 - ... by entry for non-payment of the rent, or for doing of waste or other forfeiture...
Page 104 - ... such conditions as either are incident to the reversion, as rent, or for the benefit of the estate, as for not doing of waste, for keeping the houses in reparations, for making of fences, scouring of ditches, for preserving of woods, or such like, and not for the payment of any sum in gross, delivery of corn, wood, or the like...
Page 173 - I give, devise, and bequeath all the rest and residue of my estate to my son...
Page 783 - ... to A. and his heirs, to such uses as A. shall appoint ; and, in default of appointment, to the use of himself, hie heirs and assigns, the power of appointment is void ; but that, if lands are conveyed to B.
Page 166 - It is a rule of law, that when the ancestor, by any gift or conveyance, takes an estate of freehold ; and in the same gift or conveyance an estate is limited, either mediately or immediately to his heirs in fee or in tail, that always in such cases, the heirs are words of limitation of the estate, and not words of purchase.
Page 149 - A contingent remainder is a remainder limited so as to depend on an event or condition which may never happen or be performed, or which may not happen or be performed till after the determination of the preceding estate...
Page 761 - J.'s first and other sons in tail male ; remainder to his daughters as tenants in common in tail, with cross remainders in tail between them, if more than one, with remainders over ; A.
Page 694 - Nothing is better established than this principle, that money directed to be employed in the purchase of land, and land directed to be sold and turned into money, are to be considered as that species of property into which they are directed to be converted: and this, in whatever manner the direction is given...
Page 4 - Estates upon condition implied in law are where a grant of an estate has a condition annexed to it inseparably, from its essence and constitution, although no condition be expressed in words. As if a grant be made to a man of an office...

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