Progress in Botany, Volume 62

Front Cover
Karl Esser, J. W. Kadereit, U. Luttge
Springer Science & Business Media, Dec 4, 2000 - Science - 467 pages
0 Reviews

With one volume each year, this series keeps scientists and advanced students informed of the latest developments and results in all areas of the plant sciences. The present volume includes reviews on genetics, cell biology, and vegetation science.

  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Review
3
Genetics
15
Intron Distribution
18
ProteinAssisted Splicing
20
Intron Mobility
22
Transposition to Ectopic Sites
25
Future Prospects
28
References
29
CO₂ Fixation by Stressed Plants
254
CO₂ Fixation when CO₂ is Supply Abundant
255
References
256
The Metabolic Diversity of Plant Cell and Tissue Cultures
266
Metabolic Diversity of Higher Plants and Their In Vitro Cultures
267
Novel Natural Products from Cell and Tissue Cultures of Higher Plants
269
Strategies to Induce the Formation of Natural Products in Plant Cell and Tissue Cultures
293
Conclusions
295

Barley Mutagenesis
34
Molecular Analysis of Barley Mutants Induced by Radiation or Chemicals
35
Fast Forward Genetics Chromosome Landing Refined
36
Barley Reverse Genetics
38
Extending the Mutant Banks of Barley Contribution from Arabidopsis
39
The Nature of RetroTransposons
41
The Mutagenic Impact and Application of RetroTransposons
42
Mutational Breeding in Barley an Example Improving Nutritional Qualities
43
Cytoplasmic Linear DoubleStranded DNA Killer Elements of the Dairy Yeast Kluyveromyces lactis
51
Genetic Organization of the Killer Plasmids
52
Zymocin Toxin
53
Biogenesis Assembly and Secretion
54
Immunity
55
Mode of Action
56
Resistance
57
Replication
59
Gene Expression
61
Translation
63
Conclusions and Outlook
65
Genetics and Biogenesis of Mitochondria
71
PetitePositive and PetiteNegative Yeasts
72
Transfer of Mitochondrial Genes to the Nucleus
73
Gene Transfer to Mitochondria
74
Retrograde Regulation
76
Proteins with Dual Function andor Dual Localization
78
New Aspects
79
Mitochondrial Protein Transport in Higher Plants
80
PreSequences
81
The Translocases of the Mitochondrial Outer and Inner Membranes
82
Processing Peptidases
84
Chaperones
85
Differences Between Plants and Yeast
86
Protein Export
87
References
89
Genetics of Phytopathogenic Bacteria
98
The hrp Genes of Phytopathogenic Bacteria
99
Regulation of hrp Genes
102
Harpins and Avr Proteins
103
Plant Defense
105
Hypersensitive Cell Death and Other Locally Induced Defense Reactions
106
Outlook
108
Transgenic Crops for the Third Millennium
114
Methods for Gene Transfer and Expression of Foreign DNA in Higher Plants
116
AgrobacteriumMediated Transformation
117
Regeneration Selection and Verification of Transformed Plants
118
Targeted Gene Expression
119
Silencing of Transformed Genes
120
Improvements in Agriculture
121
Herbicide Resistance
122
Resistance to Viral Pathogens
123
Artificially Introduced Male Sterility to Produce Hybrid Seeds
124
Improving Plant Micronutrients
125
Biodegradable Plastics from Transgenic Plants
126
Current Use of Genetically Engineered Plants and Future Prospects
127
Recent Controversies Regarding the Safety of GM Plants
129
References
131
Modification of Oilseed Quality by Genetic Transformation
140
Biosynthesis and Composition of Vegetable Oil
141
Regeneration Capacity of Oilseed Plants
144
Sunflower H annuus
147
Tools for Genetic Transformation of Oil Plants
149
Biolistic Approach
150
AgrobacteriumMediated Transformation
151
Sunflower
154
State of the Art
156
Transgenic Oilseed Plants with Novel Traits
157
Release of Transgenic Oilseeds into the Field
161
Future Trends and Perspectives
164
References
166
Physiology
175
Significance of PhloemTranslocated Organic Sulfur Compounds for the Regulation of Sulfur Nutrition
177
PhloemTranslocated Organic Sulfur Compounds
179
Consequences of Phloem Transport of Sulfur for the Organic Sulfur Content of the Roots
181
Regulation of Sulfate Uptake
183
Consequences of Phloem Translocation for the Regulation of Sulfate Uptake
186
Conclusions
188
References
189
Mutualistic Relationships Between Algae and Fungi Excluding Lichens
194
General Aspects
195
Mutualistic Relationships between Algae and Fungi in Acidic Habitats
196
Benefit of Algae by Association with Fungi
199
Dissolved Inorganic Carbon
203
Abscisic Acid
204
Oxygen
206
Mutualistic Relationships Between Algae and Bacteria
207
The Geosiphon Association
210
References
212
Location of Signal Perception Transduction and Response
215
The CellWall Structure and the Proteins of the ECM
216
The Chemical Composition of the Apoplast
218
Remodeling of the ECM during Development
219
Responses to Environmental Stimuli
220
PathogenesisRelated Deconstruction or Adaptation of the Cell Wall
221
Signal Perception in the Extracellular Space
222
SevenTransmembraneDomain Receptors
225
Arabinogalactan Proteins
227
Signal Transduction
228
Proteases
229
Expansins
231
Perspectives
232
Carbon Metabolism from DNA to Deoxyribose
238
The Chloroplast
239
Other CalvinCycle Enzymes
241
Transitory Starch Metabolism
243
The Photosynthetic Cell
244
Sucrose Biosynthesis
246
Mitochondria Respiration and the Oxidative PentoseP Pathway
248
Photorespiration
249
C₄ Photosynthesis
250
Crassulacean Acid Metabolism
251
The Whole Plant
253
References
296
Systematics
305
19971999
307
Progress from 1997 to 1999
308
Advances in Methodology
310
DNA Fingerprinting
311
Systematic Progress in NonAngiosperms
313
Systematic Progress in Angiosperms
314
Basal Angiosperms Excluding Monocots
315
Basal Eudicots
316
Caryophyllids
317
Rosids
318
Asterids
319
Hybridization and Introgression
321
Polyploid Origins
322
Interfacing Ecology and Systematics
324
Interfacing Development and Systematics
325
Future Prospects and Problems
326
References
327
Genomics Meets Phylogeny
340
Genomics Meets Phylogeny
341
Bonsai Genomics the Phylogeny of Mitochondria Plastids and Nucleomorphs
347
Plastids and Nucleomorphs
354
References
370
Systematics of Bryophytes
383
Phylogeny
384
Speciation Population Biology
387
Taxonomy Revisions
388
Flora Checklists
390
Conservation
391
References
392
Ecology
397
The Search for Generality in Studies of Disturbance and Ecosystem Dynamics
399
Patchiness and Heterogeneity
400
Human Effects on Natural Disturbance Regimes
401
Habitat Fragmentation
402
Climate Change
403
ExoticSpecies Invasions
404
Problems with the Relative Definition
406
The Absolute Definition
407
Diffuse and Discrete Disturbances
409
e Other Definition Issues
411
Heterogeneity Homogeneity and Scale
412
What Hinders the Development of Generality in Disturbance Ecology?
414
Disturbances Interact with a Unique Topography Template
415
Disturbances Vary with Climate
416
Spatial and Temporal Variation in the Effects
418
Disturbances Vary in Patch Size
419
Disturbances Differ in Intensity and Severity and Hence in Ecosystem Legacy
420
Rates of Response and Species Adaptations Vary among Ecosystems
421
Methods of Sampling and Analysis
422
The Scale of Observation Affects Conclusions Because Disturbances Are Episodic and Patchy
423
Surrogate Variables Are Often the Only Ones Measured
424
Approaches to Generality in Disturbance Ecology
425
Approaches to Generality at the Patch Scale
426
Legacies Produced by Disturbance
428
Comparing Disturbances with Historic Precedence
429
Approaches to Generality at the MultiplePatch Scale
430
Classifying Disturbance Regimes
434
Response of Functional Groups to Disturbance
438
Dominant Growth Forms
439
Choosing a Focus of Interest Level of Resolution and Degree of Abstraction
440
Describing Disturbance
441
Determining Patterns in Disturbance Regimes Correlation of Spatial and Temporal Parameters
442
References
443
Heterogeneous SoilResource Distribution and Plant Responses from IndividualPlant Growth to Ecosystem Functioning
451
Background
452
Abiotic Causes of SoilResource Heterogeneity
453
Biotic Causes of SoilResource Heterogeneity
454
Patterns of Heterogeneity
456
Response Variables at Different Levels of Organization
457
Plant Responses
458
PlantFungus Interaction
461
PlantPlant Interactions Within and Between Populations of Different Species
462
Plant CommunityEcosystem Responses
464
Conclusions and Future Directions
466
References
467
The Existence of Bark and Stem Photosynthesis in Woody Plants and Its Significance for the Overall Carbon Gain An EcoPhysiological and Ecologic...
477
Anatomy and Morphology of the Bark and Rhytidome
481
Location and Anatomy
483
The Chloropyll Content of Stems as Green as Leaves?
484
How Much Chloropyll Is It?
485
Microclimatic Considerations
486
Bark Temperatures
487
Peridermal and Rhytidomal Light Transmission
488
The Source of CO2 StemInternal or External CO2?
490
C02 Flux in Stems from Inside to Outside or Vice Versa?
492
Aqueous Transport of CO2
493
CO2 Consumption Via Bark Photosynthesis
494
Light Response of Bark Photosynthesis
496
Wood Photosynthesis Evidence of a Fairy Tale
497
Ecological Considerations
498
Air Pollution
499
Corticular Photosynthesis at the WholePlant Level
501
Open Questions and Aims for Further Studies
503
References
504
Ecological Aspects of Clonal Growth in Plants
511
Sexual Versus Clonal Propagation
512
Dispersal and Population Development
513
Genetic Diversity
515
Implications of Herbivory and Disease for Clonal Growth
516
Processes Within Clones Clonal Fragments
517
Division of Labor
519
Foraging
520
Processes Between Clones Clonal Fragments
521
Patterns in the Development of Clonal Plant Populations at the Community Level
523
Conclusions
524
References
525
Subject Index
531
Copyright

Common terms and phrases