The First Part of the Institutes of the Laws of England, Or, A Commentary Upon Littleton (Google eBook)

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Contents

I
ccxvii
II
13
III
32
IV
19
V
27
VI
18
VII
28
VIII
67
XIX
158
XX
161
XXI
170
XXII
212
XXIII
240
XXIV
265
XXV
274
XXVI
295

IX
73
X
78
XI
84
XII
90
XIII
94
XIV
73
XV
116
XVI
133
XVII
145
XVIII
153
XXVII
324
XXVIII
384
XXIX
415
XXX
444
XXXI
515
XXXII
551
XXXIII
588
XXXIV
659
XXXV
696
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 3 - All the whole heavens are the Lord's : The earth hath he given to the children of men.
Page 19 - A reversion is where the residue of the estate always doth continue in him that made the particular estate, or where the particular estate is derived out of his estate.
Page 19 - TENANT by the curtesy of England is where a man taketh a wife seised in fee simple, or in fee tail general, or seised as heir in tail especial, and hath issue by the same wife, male or female born alive, albeit the issue after dieth or liveth, yet if the wife dies, the husband shall hold the land during his life by the law of England.
Page ccxxvi - If a man be baptized by the name of Thomas, and after at his confirmation by the bishop he is named John, he may purchase by the name of his confirmation. And this was the case of Sir Francis...
Page 11 - Butler was quoted as laying down that 'whenever a devise gives to the heir the same estate in quality as he would have by descent, he shall take by the latter, which is the title most favoured by the law.' The Court held that this rule did not favour the claim, since an estate by devise differed from one by descent in this very quality, that the bequest was intended for the sole and exclusive use of the devisee, and therefore shut out all rights that would otherwise arise by implication of law. JDM...
Page xxxvi - the most perfect and absolute work that ever was written in any human science...
Page ccxix - Of fee simple, it is commonly holden that there be three kinds, viz., fee simple absolute, fee simple conditional, and fee simple qualified, or a base fee. But the more genuine and apt division were to divide fee, that is, inheritance, into three parts, viz., simple or absolute, conditional, and qualified or base. For this word (simple) properly excludeth both conditions and limitations that defeat or abridge the fee.
Page 1 - Also purchase is called the possession of lands or tenements that a man hath by his deed or agreement, unto •which possession he cometh not by title of descent from any of his ancestors, or of his cousins, but by his own deed.
Page 21 - For in every gift in tail without more saying the reversion of the fee simple is in the donor. And the donees and their issue shall do to the donor and to his heirs the like services as the donor doth to his lord next paramount...
Page xlii - Albeit the student shall not at any one day, do " what he can, reach to the full meaning of all that is here " laid down, yet let him no way discourage himself but " proceed : for on some other day, in some other place," (or perhaps upon a second perusal of the same,) " his doubts

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