The Tea-table Miscellany: A Collection of Choice Songs, Scots and English. Reprinted from the 14th Ed, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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J. Crum, 1871 - Ballads, English
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Page 237 - Flows Yarrow sweet? as sweet, as sweet flows Tweed, As green its grass, its gowan as yellow, As sweet smells on its braes the birk, The apple frae the rock as mellow.
Page 144 - Bethink thee, William, of thy fault, Thy pledge, and broken oath: And give me back my maiden vow, And give me back my troth.
Page 179 - Glasgow town, We were a comely sight to see; My love was clad in the black velvet, And I mysel
Page 145 - Margaret's name, And thrice he wept full sore ; Then laid his cheek to her cold grave, And word...
Page 126 - To yield thee all a maiden durst. Thou swore for ever true to prove, Thy faith unchang'd, unchang'd thy love; But quick as thought the change is wrought, Thy love's no mair, thy promise nought. Balow, my boy, etc. I wish I were a maid again! From young men's...
Page 88 - A painted Room, and silken Bed, May please a Lawland Laird and Lady; But I can kiss, and be as glad, Behind a Bush in's Highland Plaidy. Few Compliments between us pass, I ca' him my Dear Highland Laddie, And he ca's me his Lawland Lass; Syne rows me in beneath his Plaidy.
Page 144 - How could you say my face was fair, And yet that face forsake? How could you win my virgin heart, Yet leave that heart to break?
Page 209 - Just entered in her teens, Fair as the day, and sweet as May, Fair as the day, and always gay. My Peggy is a young thing, And I'm not very auld, Yet well I like to meet her at The wauking of the fauld. My Peggy speaks sae sweetly, Whene'er we meet alane, I wish nae mair to lay my care, — I wish nae mair of a' that's rare. My Peggy speaks sae sweetly, To a' the lave I'm cauld; But she gars a' my spirits glow, At wauking of the fauld.
Page 106 - Alexander I will reign, And I will reign alone ; My thoughts did evermore disdain A rival on my throne. He either fears his fate too much, Or his deserts are small, Who dares not put it to the touch, To gain or lose it all.
Page 179 - Love did lichtly me. O waly waly, but love be bonny A little time while it is new ; But when 'tis auld, it waxeth cauld And fades awa

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